Space

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Using the heightmap from the recent "clearest image of Venus" post, I photoshopped what Venus' oceans might look like

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • rkrause
    1 points Aug 18,2019, 8:39pm

    This makes me wish I could live on Venus -- if it wasn't for the toxic atmosphere and extreme climate and other inhospitable surface conditions :)

  • 3oclockam
    1 points Aug 18,2019, 7:37pm

    Fantastic work! Now Photoshop Earth as if it had global warming as bad as Venus. Lol ok. Nice one though

COMMENTS

  • rkrause
    1 points Aug 18,2019, 8:39pm

    This makes me wish I could live on Venus -- if it wasn't for the toxic atmosphere and extreme climate and other inhospitable surface conditions :)

  • 3oclockam
    1 points Aug 18,2019, 7:37pm

    Fantastic work! Now Photoshop Earth as if it had global warming as bad as Venus. Lol ok. Nice one though

● ● ●

Had a beach on Cape Cod all to myself a couple weeks ago and took this picture of the Milky Way

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • advillious
    1 points Aug 18,2019, 5:23pm

    hi friends. i'm an astrophotographer from Boston. dark skies are hard to come by in the North East but I've had some luck on the Cape. this is a single exposure. 13" at f/2.8. the purple hue is a white balance adjustment to try and cancel out the ugly light pollution in the bottom right of the image.

  • Squipe
    1 points Aug 18,2019, 6:40pm

    It's weird to see all these stars toghtly together knowing they each are probably lightyears apart from each other

COMMENTS

  • advillious
    1 points Aug 18,2019, 5:23pm

    hi friends. i'm an astrophotographer from Boston. dark skies are hard to come by in the North East but I've had some luck on the Cape. this is a single exposure. 13" at f/2.8. the purple hue is a white balance adjustment to try and cancel out the ugly light pollution in the bottom right of the image.

  • Squipe
    1 points Aug 18,2019, 6:40pm

    It's weird to see all these stars toghtly together knowing they each are probably lightyears apart from each other

● ● ●

My shot of the full Moon!

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • messi10god
    1 points Aug 17,2019, 8:01pm

    Taken in sydney aus. Using sony a7s ii plus a 420-800mm lens

  • DanielJStein
    1 points Aug 17,2019, 8:07pm

    Really sharp, especially in the details of the craters. Were you shooting on a tracker?

COMMENTS

  • messi10god
    1 points Aug 17,2019, 8:01pm

    Taken in sydney aus. Using sony a7s ii plus a 420-800mm lens

  • DanielJStein
    1 points Aug 17,2019, 8:07pm

    Really sharp, especially in the details of the craters. Were you shooting on a tracker?

● ● ●

The Moon and Jupiter (Single Exposure Image)

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • nogberter
    3 points Aug 04,2019, 2:05pm

    I was inspired to post this picture I took a couple of years ago by the nice image posted by u/selenophile_photo (link).

    Unlike his photo, I took this as a single exposure, not a composite. I wasnt even sure that it was jupiter in the photo until i looked on the computer and saw its moons. I used a Sony A7rii with Tamron 150-600mm lens. I'm pretty sure I actually took this handheld. Sorry I dont have the exposure details available. Photo was adjusted in lightroom.

  • MrFahrenheit_451
    2 points Aug 04,2019, 3:06pm

    Very nice photo. Honestly, from experience, I don’t think you could have taken this photo hand held. It must have been a fairly long exposure to also get the background stars, with little trailing. I’m guessing a 1 or 2 second exposure? If you hand held this the background stars would have been all over the place as it’s nearly impossible to get them that way without the camera being left still.

  • Fastfaxr
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 4:56pm

    What time of day was this taken and how high was the moon?

COMMENTS

  • nogberter
    3 points Aug 04,2019, 2:05pm

    I was inspired to post this picture I took a couple of years ago by the nice image posted by u/selenophile_photo (link).

    Unlike his photo, I took this as a single exposure, not a composite. I wasnt even sure that it was jupiter in the photo until i looked on the computer and saw its moons. I used a Sony A7rii with Tamron 150-600mm lens. I'm pretty sure I actually took this handheld. Sorry I dont have the exposure details available. Photo was adjusted in lightroom.

  • MrFahrenheit_451
    2 points Aug 04,2019, 3:06pm

    Very nice photo. Honestly, from experience, I don’t think you could have taken this photo hand held. It must have been a fairly long exposure to also get the background stars, with little trailing. I’m guessing a 1 or 2 second exposure? If you hand held this the background stars would have been all over the place as it’s nearly impossible to get them that way without the camera being left still.

  • Fastfaxr
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 4:56pm

    What time of day was this taken and how high was the moon?

● ● ●

View of launch pad (Camera E-8) after Apollo 11 Saturn V lift off. July 16, 1969

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • Stu408
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 5:31pm

    That's what I’d imagine being in a nuclear blast would look like. You know, before looking like Sarah Conner, having onto a chain-link fence.

  • DCdoctr
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:53pm

    Me when I see suspicious looking spider egg sacs on my garage door...

  • dave_890
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:58pm

    The rocket hold-downs to make sure the rocket is at full thrust before being released. Everything in the video was painted with a special paint that would char. This formed a protective layer between the heat and the surfaces.

    Fun fact: the "crawler" that took the rocket from the Assembly Building to the launch pads - a journey of about 3.5 miles - got 19 FEET to the gallon.

COMMENTS

  • Stu408
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 5:31pm

    That's what I’d imagine being in a nuclear blast would look like. You know, before looking like Sarah Conner, having onto a chain-link fence.

  • DCdoctr
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:53pm

    Me when I see suspicious looking spider egg sacs on my garage door...

  • dave_890
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:58pm

    The rocket hold-downs to make sure the rocket is at full thrust before being released. Everything in the video was painted with a special paint that would char. This formed a protective layer between the heat and the surfaces.

    Fun fact: the "crawler" that took the rocket from the Assembly Building to the launch pads - a journey of about 3.5 miles - got 19 FEET to the gallon.

  • mossberg91
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 5:27pm

● ● ●

Space X escape module test

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • peppers_taste_bad
    572 points Aug 04,2019, 2:10pm

    Looks exactly like one of my first flights in KSP

  • LeaveMeAlone68
    205 points Aug 04,2019, 3:13pm

    Interesting, you can see the umbilical disconnect from the capsule just before it separates from the service module. I've read about this process on Apollo but never seen it in action. In case you're wondering, the umbilical is used to pass power, water, wires from the service module to the capsule. You can't pass it internally without compromising the heat shield on the bottom of the capsule so an external umbilical is used that disconnects and snaps back just before separation.

  • lolz977
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 6:06pm

    Just a question. If the challenger shuttle had this technology would we possibly have been able to save the crew that perished during explosion?

    Like were there indicators during launch that something wasnt performing nominally with enough time before the explosion to do something?

  • Ells1812
    44 points Aug 04,2019, 2:01pm

    Very cool, although I wouldn't want to be in it considering the g forces youd experience

  • IAmYourShadow
    11 points Aug 04,2019, 3:57pm

    Quick question, what are the parachute wires made of, that they don't get torn by the sheer force of the pull upon deployment?

  • JBorrelli12
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 5:24pm

    Sorry for the dummy but in what scenario would this escape module be used? Sounds self explanatory with “escape” but i’m still very curious.

  • Ndsamu
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 5:56pm

    So I’m curious... this module obviously has to accelerate as we see here before reaching maximum speed. But assuming the Rocket is already going to be going extremely fast at this point, is it guaranteed that the module will properly escape?

    My intuition tells me that similar to throwing a baseball in a moving car, the velocities are combined. But I have to imagine that there are other factors like air resistance and the sheer thrust of the main rocket that come into play.

  • irate_alien
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 6:32pm

    I wonder how many g his is. Beats the alternative I guess

  • DetectiveFinch
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:07pm

    This video is from a test flight in 2015.

    If all goes well we'll see an unmanned escape test during a flight on a full rocket in the near future.

    SpaceX will attempt to fire the escape system during max-Q, the part of the launch with the highest aerodynamic pressure on the vehicle.

  • Electric_Plankton
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:30pm

    This feels like it would benefit from a little r/reallifedoodles :)

  • autohome123
    5 points Aug 04,2019, 2:02pm

    Weren’t they going to do a redesign?

    I guess I missed the news on the redesign? How did they redesign and test this quickly?

  • nolocynnur
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 5:11pm

    Hahaha. For just a second I thought it was someone sticking their arm out to give a thumbs up .. "Yup, works great guys!...aww damn there goes my arm .."

  • mrsmegz
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 6:47pm

    I don't know what it is about this that makes it comical to me, but it makes me laugh when I watch it. I guess its that huge pad with that little bitty capsule on it just hauling ass so fast out of there, its like it needs a 'NOPE' txt bubble at ignition.

  • coffeeaddict1021
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 6:35pm

    We all know what’s in Elon Musks backyard now.

  • sandman0086
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 6:38pm

    Does anyone know how many gallons of water that is? That’s incredible.

  • Decronym
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:18pm

    Acronyms, initialisms, abbreviations, contractions, and other phrases which expand to something larger, that I've seen in this thread:

    Fewer LettersMore Letters
    BFRBig Falcon Rocket (2018 rebiggened edition)
    Yes, the F stands for something else; no, you're not the first to notice
    EVAExtra-Vehicular Activity
    KSPKerbal Space Program, the rocketry simulator
    MMHMono-Methyl Hydrazine, (CH3)HN-NH2; part of NTO/MMH hypergolic mix
    NTOdiNitrogen TetrOxide, N2O4; part of NTO/MMH hypergolic mix
    OMSOrbital Maneuvering System
    RUDRapid Unplanned Disassembly
    Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly
    Rapid Unintended Disassembly
    SLC-40Space Launch Complex 40, Canaveral (SpaceX F9)
    SRBSolid Rocket Booster
    SSMESpace Shuttle Main Engine
    JargonDefinition
    RaptorMethane-fueled rocket engine under development by SpaceX
    hypergolicA set of two substances that ignite when in contact
    rainbirdsWater deluge system at the launch tower base, activated just before ignition
    turbopumpHigh-pressure turbine-driven propellant pump connected to a rocket combustion chamber; raises chamber pressure, and thrust

    [Thread #4027 for this sub, first seen 4th Aug 2019, 23:17] [FAQ] [Full list] [Contact] [Source code]

  • dickturd9000
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:37pm

    I can't even imagine what it must be like to be in that thing during an abort... looks very uncomfortable

  • Hockeyfan_52
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:38pm

    I don't know why but I found that really funny.

  • 6ames
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:45pm

    it felt like it was falling forever; i was prepared for a "welp, next time" ending

  • infinitelolipop
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 8:00pm

    Question, isn’t having all three parachutes come out from the same location risking a lot, if that particular area gets damaged somehow?

  • flexylol
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 8:04pm

    When the Challenger disaster happened, Challenger didn't actually "explode" (common misconception) but "disintegrated " - the crew module separated in one piece, and then relatively smoothly continued upward in an arc for quite some time before it went downwards. I also remember from reports there was likely no decompression and likely no fatal Gs involved, until impact. Saying, the Challenger disaster, from this point of view seemed to have been eerily survivable if it had such a system.

  • FlyingSeaMan509
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 8:14pm

    Me performing the ol’ cum’n’scoot post coitus.

  • chet_atkins_
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 4:38pm

    That’s actually me escaping doing the dishes

  • Dheorl
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 5:27pm

    Well that thing just went and yeeted on out of there.

    I'm slightly surprised by how much it tumbles after disconnecting.

  • AsbestosTheBest
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:15pm

    Maybe I’m imagining it, I appreciate how SpaceX designs things with a bit more surface-level sexiness than say Boeing or Lockheed or even NASA.

  • DrColdReality
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 6:56pm

    Isn't that just so amazingly awesome in every way!!!!!!

    SpaceX just did what almost every other spacecraft built since the 1950s has done!!!

COMMENTS

  • peppers_taste_bad
    572 points Aug 04,2019, 2:10pm

    Looks exactly like one of my first flights in KSP

  • LeaveMeAlone68
    205 points Aug 04,2019, 3:13pm

    Interesting, you can see the umbilical disconnect from the capsule just before it separates from the service module. I've read about this process on Apollo but never seen it in action. In case you're wondering, the umbilical is used to pass power, water, wires from the service module to the capsule. You can't pass it internally without compromising the heat shield on the bottom of the capsule so an external umbilical is used that disconnects and snaps back just before separation.

  • lolz977
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 6:06pm

    Just a question. If the challenger shuttle had this technology would we possibly have been able to save the crew that perished during explosion?

    Like were there indicators during launch that something wasnt performing nominally with enough time before the explosion to do something?

  • deleted
    21 points Aug 04,2019, 4:30pm

    [removed]

  • Ells1812
    44 points Aug 04,2019, 2:01pm

    Very cool, although I wouldn't want to be in it considering the g forces youd experience

  • IAmYourShadow
    11 points Aug 04,2019, 3:57pm

    Quick question, what are the parachute wires made of, that they don't get torn by the sheer force of the pull upon deployment?

  • JBorrelli12
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 5:24pm

    Sorry for the dummy but in what scenario would this escape module be used? Sounds self explanatory with “escape” but i’m still very curious.

  • Ndsamu
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 5:56pm

    So I’m curious... this module obviously has to accelerate as we see here before reaching maximum speed. But assuming the Rocket is already going to be going extremely fast at this point, is it guaranteed that the module will properly escape?

    My intuition tells me that similar to throwing a baseball in a moving car, the velocities are combined. But I have to imagine that there are other factors like air resistance and the sheer thrust of the main rocket that come into play.

  • irate_alien
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 6:32pm

    I wonder how many g his is. Beats the alternative I guess

  • DetectiveFinch
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:07pm

    This video is from a test flight in 2015.

    If all goes well we'll see an unmanned escape test during a flight on a full rocket in the near future.

    SpaceX will attempt to fire the escape system during max-Q, the part of the launch with the highest aerodynamic pressure on the vehicle.

  • Electric_Plankton
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:30pm

    This feels like it would benefit from a little r/reallifedoodles :)

  • autohome123
    5 points Aug 04,2019, 2:02pm

    Weren’t they going to do a redesign?

    I guess I missed the news on the redesign? How did they redesign and test this quickly?

  • nolocynnur
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 5:11pm

    Hahaha. For just a second I thought it was someone sticking their arm out to give a thumbs up .. "Yup, works great guys!...aww damn there goes my arm .."

  • mrsmegz
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 6:47pm

    I don't know what it is about this that makes it comical to me, but it makes me laugh when I watch it. I guess its that huge pad with that little bitty capsule on it just hauling ass so fast out of there, its like it needs a 'NOPE' txt bubble at ignition.

  • coffeeaddict1021
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 6:35pm

    We all know what’s in Elon Musks backyard now.

  • sandman0086
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 6:38pm

    Does anyone know how many gallons of water that is? That’s incredible.

  • Decronym
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:18pm

    Acronyms, initialisms, abbreviations, contractions, and other phrases which expand to something larger, that I've seen in this thread:

    Fewer LettersMore Letters
    BFRBig Falcon Rocket (2018 rebiggened edition)
    Yes, the F stands for something else; no, you're not the first to notice
    EVAExtra-Vehicular Activity
    KSPKerbal Space Program, the rocketry simulator
    MMHMono-Methyl Hydrazine, (CH3)HN-NH2; part of NTO/MMH hypergolic mix
    NTOdiNitrogen TetrOxide, N2O4; part of NTO/MMH hypergolic mix
    OMSOrbital Maneuvering System
    RUDRapid Unplanned Disassembly
    Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly
    Rapid Unintended Disassembly
    SLC-40Space Launch Complex 40, Canaveral (SpaceX F9)
    SRBSolid Rocket Booster
    SSMESpace Shuttle Main Engine
    JargonDefinition
    RaptorMethane-fueled rocket engine under development by SpaceX
    hypergolicA set of two substances that ignite when in contact
    rainbirdsWater deluge system at the launch tower base, activated just before ignition
    turbopumpHigh-pressure turbine-driven propellant pump connected to a rocket combustion chamber; raises chamber pressure, and thrust

    [Thread #4027 for this sub, first seen 4th Aug 2019, 23:17] [FAQ] [Full list] [Contact] [Source code]

  • dickturd9000
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:37pm

    I can't even imagine what it must be like to be in that thing during an abort... looks very uncomfortable

  • Hockeyfan_52
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:38pm

    I don't know why but I found that really funny.

  • 6ames
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:45pm

    it felt like it was falling forever; i was prepared for a "welp, next time" ending

  • infinitelolipop
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 8:00pm

    Question, isn’t having all three parachutes come out from the same location risking a lot, if that particular area gets damaged somehow?

  • flexylol
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 8:04pm

    When the Challenger disaster happened, Challenger didn't actually "explode" (common misconception) but "disintegrated " - the crew module separated in one piece, and then relatively smoothly continued upward in an arc for quite some time before it went downwards. I also remember from reports there was likely no decompression and likely no fatal Gs involved, until impact. Saying, the Challenger disaster, from this point of view seemed to have been eerily survivable if it had such a system.

  • FlyingSeaMan509
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 8:14pm

    Me performing the ol’ cum’n’scoot post coitus.

  • chet_atkins_
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 4:38pm

    That’s actually me escaping doing the dishes

  • Dheorl
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 5:27pm

    Well that thing just went and yeeted on out of there.

    I'm slightly surprised by how much it tumbles after disconnecting.

  • AsbestosTheBest
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 7:15pm

    Maybe I’m imagining it, I appreciate how SpaceX designs things with a bit more surface-level sexiness than say Boeing or Lockheed or even NASA.

  • DrColdReality
    1 points Aug 04,2019, 6:56pm

    Isn't that just so amazingly awesome in every way!!!!!!

    SpaceX just did what almost every other spacecraft built since the 1950s has done!!!

● ● ●

The booster from SpaceX’s CRS-18 mission this morning [OC]

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • ReallyNotATrollAtAll
    2 points Jul 28,2019, 7:22am

    Are they gonna lift it into space with that crane?

  • azzkicker7283
    2 points Jul 28,2019, 7:29am

    Happened to get back into port Canaveral this morning from a cruise, and I managed to see the booster through some 25x100 binoculars mounted on the boat. I just held my phone up the the eyepiece to snap the pic, as well as a few others of the launch pads and the SpaceX boats/barge in the port.

COMMENTS

  • ReallyNotATrollAtAll
    2 points Jul 28,2019, 7:22am

    Are they gonna lift it into space with that crane?

  • azzkicker7283
    2 points Jul 28,2019, 7:29am

    Happened to get back into port Canaveral this morning from a cruise, and I managed to see the booster through some 25x100 binoculars mounted on the boat. I just held my phone up the the eyepiece to snap the pic, as well as a few others of the launch pads and the SpaceX boats/barge in the port.

● ● ●

(OC) Huge custom-built 10 inch telescope.

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • Dirtythrowawayukmale
    33 points Jul 28,2019, 7:16am

    You must get a, great fucking view of the wooden ceiling with that.

  • reddymcredditface
    3 points Jul 28,2019, 8:23am

    Getting a new Dob soon....a truss one though, that one's a beast..

  • vichn
    3 points Jul 28,2019, 9:12am

    Seems too long for a 10-inch for a Newton reflector, like twice as long. The picture will be very dark, or am I wrong? Or is this a weird perspective? Please clarify.

    Source: have a Sky-Watcher Dob 10, which is twice(?) shorter from this one in the picture.

    Anyway, great job! My only concern would be damp soaked by the fiber tube of the telescope, its' softening, and possible mold.

  • seanbrockest
    2 points Jul 28,2019, 3:16pm

    I'm not an expert here but I think you're supposed to point it towards the window, not the ceiling.

  • Roxytumbler
    1 points Jul 28,2019, 8:38pm

    Just an aside for anyone building a telescope.

    Re parts, just about every week I see telescopes for sale in our local thrift store, some complete, some mostly all there. They can be anything from high quality scopes to those that sold for new for $99. Also every so often a homemade scope. Prices usually around $25 or so.

    Anyways, worth checking out if someone is in the market for one that works or parts to build their own. I built my own about 30 years ago for around $200. However today I could put together a much better one for $50.

COMMENTS

  • Dirtythrowawayukmale
    33 points Jul 28,2019, 7:16am

    You must get a, great fucking view of the wooden ceiling with that.

  • reddymcredditface
    3 points Jul 28,2019, 8:23am

    Getting a new Dob soon....a truss one though, that one's a beast..

  • vichn
    3 points Jul 28,2019, 9:12am

    Seems too long for a 10-inch for a Newton reflector, like twice as long. The picture will be very dark, or am I wrong? Or is this a weird perspective? Please clarify.

    Source: have a Sky-Watcher Dob 10, which is twice(?) shorter from this one in the picture.

    Anyway, great job! My only concern would be damp soaked by the fiber tube of the telescope, its' softening, and possible mold.

  • Jarelan
    3 points Jul 28,2019, 10:35am

    Can you give more pictures of the inside, plans and maybe an example of seeing a planet?

  • seanbrockest
    2 points Jul 28,2019, 3:16pm

    I'm not an expert here but I think you're supposed to point it towards the window, not the ceiling.

  • Roxytumbler
    1 points Jul 28,2019, 8:38pm

    Just an aside for anyone building a telescope.

    Re parts, just about every week I see telescopes for sale in our local thrift store, some complete, some mostly all there. They can be anything from high quality scopes to those that sold for new for $99. Also every so often a homemade scope. Prices usually around $25 or so.

    Anyways, worth checking out if someone is in the market for one that works or parts to build their own. I built my own about 30 years ago for around $200. However today I could put together a much better one for $50.

● ● ●

Current Guests At International Space Station

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • UniverseHelpDesk
    1 points Jul 28,2019, 5:21pm

    Great views but would not recommend visiting during the high-season. It is the worst!

    First, all the docking spots are busy! I’m not even kidding, we could barely find a spot and our view was blocked! Also, there’s a LOT of foreigners, I swear everyone was speaking Russian when we got there.

    Would recommend going in the fall when there’s less tourism!!

  • youknowithadtobedone
    1 points Jul 28,2019, 6:25pm

    If only a HTV was there we would have a full house

  • slartibartjars
    1 points Jul 28,2019, 6:10pm

    Fascinating. But somehow feels like it needs a Brazzers logo.

COMMENTS

  • UniverseHelpDesk
    1 points Jul 28,2019, 5:21pm

    Great views but would not recommend visiting during the high-season. It is the worst!

    First, all the docking spots are busy! I’m not even kidding, we could barely find a spot and our view was blocked! Also, there’s a LOT of foreigners, I swear everyone was speaking Russian when we got there.

    Would recommend going in the fall when there’s less tourism!!

  • youknowithadtobedone
    1 points Jul 28,2019, 6:25pm

    If only a HTV was there we would have a full house

  • slartibartjars
    1 points Jul 28,2019, 6:10pm

    Fascinating. But somehow feels like it needs a Brazzers logo.

● ● ●

Stayed up late on Tuesday and took this picture of the moon rising, was really surprised by how it turned out as I usually only shoot landscapes and family pictures

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • m4r1vs
    4 points Jul 28,2019, 2:34pm

    Shot this with my Nicon D5200 and Sigma 18-200mm lens. Composite of two separate images only seconds apart both f/6.3 1/30s and ISO1000

    Edit: spelling

COMMENTS

  • m4r1vs
    4 points Jul 28,2019, 2:34pm

    Shot this with my Nicon D5200 and Sigma 18-200mm lens. Composite of two separate images only seconds apart both f/6.3 1/30s and ISO1000

    Edit: spelling