Space

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Earth seen from Apollo 4

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • Celui-ci
    0 points Mar 24,2019, 4:42pm

    Can someone explain to me why no city lights can be seen, i thought we could see them from space

COMMENTS

  • Celui-ci
    0 points Mar 24,2019, 4:42pm

    Can someone explain to me why no city lights can be seen, i thought we could see them from space

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Apollo Walk, Aldrin Walk, Tranquility Grove... There's a housing estate in Dublin, Ireland dedicated to the 1969 moon landing

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • fensterdj
    5 points Mar 24,2019, 2:33pm

    Micheal Collins has a whole avenue dedicated to him btw

COMMENTS

  • fensterdj
    5 points Mar 24,2019, 2:33pm

    Micheal Collins has a whole avenue dedicated to him btw

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MIG 25 flying over Soviet space shuttle Buran

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • InfantryChris69
    45 points Mar 24,2019, 9:05am

    Fun fact, the MiG was actually escorting Buran on its landing. This is the pic from its first and only autonomous orbital trip.

    Yes, the landing was completely autonomous.

  • CautiousKerbal
    7 points Mar 24,2019, 9:33am

    MiG-25 SOTN, №22, pilot Magomed Tolboev, optics operator Sergei Zhadovskyi.

  • PLS-Surveyor-US
    12 points Mar 24,2019, 9:04am

    I've seen that design somewhere before....can't recall where.

  • Decronym
    2 points Mar 24,2019, 1:09pm

    Acronyms, initialisms, abbreviations, contractions, and other phrases which expand to something larger, that I've seen in this thread:

    Fewer LettersMore Letters
    DMLSSelective Laser Melting additive manufacture, also Direct Metal Laser Sintering
    EVAExtra-Vehicular Activity
    SLSSpace Launch System heavy-lift
    Selective Laser Sintering, contrast DMLS

    2 acronyms in this thread; the most compressed thread commented on today has 13 acronyms.
    [Thread #3595 for this sub, first seen 24th Mar 2019, 17:05] [FAQ] [Full list] [Contact] [Source code]

  • CalculusWarrior
    1 points Mar 24,2019, 5:12pm

    Pity the Energia program was ended, it was such a unique rocket system that could carry a great deal of payload to orbit. With more funding, we could have seen great things from it.

  • The_Great_Squijibo
    1 points Mar 24,2019, 4:36pm
  • seductus
    1 points Mar 24,2019, 6:22pm

    A Russian engineer told me the Buran was created to steal American satellites.

  • deleted
    -12 points Mar 24,2019, 8:43am

    [deleted]

COMMENTS

  • InfantryChris69
    45 points Mar 24,2019, 9:05am

    Fun fact, the MiG was actually escorting Buran on its landing. This is the pic from its first and only autonomous orbital trip.

    Yes, the landing was completely autonomous.

  • CautiousKerbal
    7 points Mar 24,2019, 9:33am

    MiG-25 SOTN, №22, pilot Magomed Tolboev, optics operator Sergei Zhadovskyi.

  • PLS-Surveyor-US
    12 points Mar 24,2019, 9:04am

    I've seen that design somewhere before....can't recall where.

  • interadastingly
    19 points Mar 24,2019, 9:37am

    Everyone likes to think that our space program is so much better than the Soviet/Russian programs. Those same people forget or omit the fact that they challenged the rest of of the world and the US to start the space race.

    They had the first satellite ever to orbit the Earth and reenter our atmosphere 3 months later.

    They ran the first manned missions to orbit the Earth.

    The Soviet program also had the first EVA (spacewalk) in 1965.

    They also created a new version of the space shuttle (above) that could carry over THREE TIMES as much cargo (95 tons) as the NASA shuttle, and had a more reliable (safer) launch system using liquid fuel instead of solid fuel. See: Challenger explosion.

    Russia is also the main partner we have in the ISS initiatives, and have been providing rocket engines for launching our supplies, and missions to the ISS.

    Give credit where credit is due. Sure, there are problems with Russian politics, but their space program is a shining example of modern engineering and technology since the 50s.

    Edit: this was meant as a reply to u/WEareCR below

  • Decronym
    2 points Mar 24,2019, 1:09pm

    Acronyms, initialisms, abbreviations, contractions, and other phrases which expand to something larger, that I've seen in this thread:

    Fewer LettersMore Letters
    DMLSSelective Laser Melting additive manufacture, also Direct Metal Laser Sintering
    EVAExtra-Vehicular Activity
    SLSSpace Launch System heavy-lift
    Selective Laser Sintering, contrast DMLS

    2 acronyms in this thread; the most compressed thread commented on today has 13 acronyms.
    [Thread #3595 for this sub, first seen 24th Mar 2019, 17:05] [FAQ] [Full list] [Contact] [Source code]

  • CalculusWarrior
    1 points Mar 24,2019, 5:12pm

    Pity the Energia program was ended, it was such a unique rocket system that could carry a great deal of payload to orbit. With more funding, we could have seen great things from it.

  • The_Great_Squijibo
    1 points Mar 24,2019, 4:36pm
  • seductus
    1 points Mar 24,2019, 6:22pm

    A Russian engineer told me the Buran was created to steal American satellites.

  • deleted
    -12 points Mar 24,2019, 8:43am

    [deleted]

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All crewed Apollo missions represented in one painting

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • CunningCosmos
    4 points Mar 17,2019, 5:53am

    Here's an explanation of the symbolism (each is highlighted in bold with the corresponding mission):

    Apollo 1 ended in tragedy when Roger Chaffee, Gus Grissom, and Ed White died during a training exercise aboard a command module. During their training they studied celestial navigation, and had the opportunity to pick names for stars. Regor was chosen by Roger Chaffee, Navi by Gus Grissom, and Dnoces by Ed White. They are represented by the groups of three stars.

    Apollo 7 was the first crewed test flight of the command module.

    Apollo 8 was the first crewed flight of the mighty Saturn V rocket, and it was the first time humans ever left Earth orbit.

    Apollo 9 was the first crewed flight of the Lunar Module.

    • After the successful flights of all crucial hardware, Apollo 10 was the dress rehearsal for the Moon landing. The Command Module was named ‘Charlie Brown’ and the Lunar Module was named ‘Snoopy’, which is also the nickname for the headgear worn by the astronauts (due to its resemblance to the Peanuts’ character).

    Apollo 11 was the first time a human set foot on the Moon, and is represented by the footprints.

    • During the Apollo 12 mission the astronauts set down near the Surveyor 3 probe, which had landed on the moon in 1967. It was the first and only time that humans have visited a probe that had been sent to explore another world.

    Apollo 13 is often referred to as NASA’s “successful failure”. An electrical fault meant that the mission had to be cut short, and the lives of the crew were in very real danger. One of the fixes they had to put in place to ensure their own survival was an improvised CO2 scrubber.

    • Alan Shepard, the first American in space, commanded the Apollo 14 mission. Whilst on the surface of the moon he hit two golfballs with a makeshift club.

    • During Apollo 15, commander Dave Scott validated Galileo’s theory that in the absence of air resistance two objects would fall at the same rate. He dropped a hammer and feather at the same time, and they did indeed land together.

    • Charlie Duke was the youngest person to walk on the Moon, and during Apollo 16 he left a family photo on the surface.

    Apollo 17 was the last mission of the Apollo program, and the last time that a human set foot on the Moon. It was the first time that a scientist left Earth orbit, and the first time a scientist set foot on the Moon. During his time on the Moon, geologist Harrison Schmitt discovered orange soil on the surface of the moon.

    In addition to the symbolism for each mission, there is one command module for each crewed mission, one star for each person who journeyed to the Moon, and one footprint for each of the twelve men who set foot on the surface.

    I'd be happy to answer any questions you might have about the piece :)

COMMENTS

  • CunningCosmos
    4 points Mar 17,2019, 5:53am

    Here's an explanation of the symbolism (each is highlighted in bold with the corresponding mission):

    Apollo 1 ended in tragedy when Roger Chaffee, Gus Grissom, and Ed White died during a training exercise aboard a command module. During their training they studied celestial navigation, and had the opportunity to pick names for stars. Regor was chosen by Roger Chaffee, Navi by Gus Grissom, and Dnoces by Ed White. They are represented by the groups of three stars.

    Apollo 7 was the first crewed test flight of the command module.

    Apollo 8 was the first crewed flight of the mighty Saturn V rocket, and it was the first time humans ever left Earth orbit.

    Apollo 9 was the first crewed flight of the Lunar Module.

    • After the successful flights of all crucial hardware, Apollo 10 was the dress rehearsal for the Moon landing. The Command Module was named ‘Charlie Brown’ and the Lunar Module was named ‘Snoopy’, which is also the nickname for the headgear worn by the astronauts (due to its resemblance to the Peanuts’ character).

    Apollo 11 was the first time a human set foot on the Moon, and is represented by the footprints.

    • During the Apollo 12 mission the astronauts set down near the Surveyor 3 probe, which had landed on the moon in 1967. It was the first and only time that humans have visited a probe that had been sent to explore another world.

    Apollo 13 is often referred to as NASA’s “successful failure”. An electrical fault meant that the mission had to be cut short, and the lives of the crew were in very real danger. One of the fixes they had to put in place to ensure their own survival was an improvised CO2 scrubber.

    • Alan Shepard, the first American in space, commanded the Apollo 14 mission. Whilst on the surface of the moon he hit two golfballs with a makeshift club.

    • During Apollo 15, commander Dave Scott validated Galileo’s theory that in the absence of air resistance two objects would fall at the same rate. He dropped a hammer and feather at the same time, and they did indeed land together.

    • Charlie Duke was the youngest person to walk on the Moon, and during Apollo 16 he left a family photo on the surface.

    Apollo 17 was the last mission of the Apollo program, and the last time that a human set foot on the Moon. It was the first time that a scientist left Earth orbit, and the first time a scientist set foot on the Moon. During his time on the Moon, geologist Harrison Schmitt discovered orange soil on the surface of the moon.

    In addition to the symbolism for each mission, there is one command module for each crewed mission, one star for each person who journeyed to the Moon, and one footprint for each of the twelve men who set foot on the surface.

    I'd be happy to answer any questions you might have about the piece :)

● ● ●

ISS Lunar Transit from last night

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • robotdinofight
    5 points Mar 17,2019, 10:23am

    I’m sooo excited about this image! This whole sequence lasted 2/3 of a second. The ISS is so detailed in these shots, you can see all the solar panels. I used the amazing site transit-finder.com to get the exact time and place. I shot this using a Canon 1DX Mark II, Canon 800mm L f/5.6 IS, & Canon 2.0 TC.

COMMENTS

  • robotdinofight
    5 points Mar 17,2019, 10:23am

    I’m sooo excited about this image! This whole sequence lasted 2/3 of a second. The ISS is so detailed in these shots, you can see all the solar panels. I used the amazing site transit-finder.com to get the exact time and place. I shot this using a Canon 1DX Mark II, Canon 800mm L f/5.6 IS, & Canon 2.0 TC.

● ● ●

Andromeda Galaxy and Moon Apparent Size Comparison

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • IanPop123
    3 points Mar 17,2019, 12:45pm

    wow, the moon is almost bigger than that tiny galaxy!

  • Seanspeed
    2 points Mar 17,2019, 1:43pm

    You could only fit 10 Andromeda galaxies between us and the real Andromeda Galaxy.

    It's pretty damn close.

  • JohnnyBeGood88
    -8 points Mar 17,2019, 1:01pm

    That shitty galaxy is the one that will collapse with Milky Way and destroy us? Lmao

COMMENTS

  • IanPop123
    3 points Mar 17,2019, 12:45pm

    wow, the moon is almost bigger than that tiny galaxy!

  • Seanspeed
    2 points Mar 17,2019, 1:43pm

    You could only fit 10 Andromeda galaxies between us and the real Andromeda Galaxy.

    It's pretty damn close.

  • JohnnyBeGood88
    -8 points Mar 17,2019, 1:01pm

    That shitty galaxy is the one that will collapse with Milky Way and destroy us? Lmao

● ● ●

Saturn V Rocketdyne F-1 engines at Johnson Space Center in Houston

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • BigBabaLou
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 6:48pm

    I've always found it interesting that there is a sign on that blue carrier vehicle that says "on loan from the Smithsonian"

  • Otakeb
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 6:47pm

    I recently shared this gallery, but seeing as how the Saturn V is getting some more attention on this sub's front page, I though I might share again.

    Here's the album of the photo's I took while visiting Johnson Space Center Houston about a week ago. Each picture has something written about the rocket commented in the description. The thing is an absolute marvel and I love that it's getting some attention.

    This is one of the last remaining Saturn Vs in the world, with only 2 others in existence. It is housed at the Houston Space Center, and was refurbished in 2001. Prior to that, it was stored outside were the Houston weather and humidity slowly corroded and degraded it. The restoration was a joint effort between the US Government, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Halliburton, and the Save America's Treasures Project.

    This and it's 2 sister rockets were originally planned to be used on Apollo 18, 19, and 20, but budget cuts due to civilian disinterest and the Vietnam War lead to the closure of the program and the unuse of the remaining Saturn V rockets.

    The brute force engineer of the Apollo program genuinely is one of humanities greatest accomplishments, in my opinion

  • mustang__1
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 6:59pm

    I've seen it in person. I felt like I appreciated it's size more in the imax doc that played last week.

    Nice pictures!

COMMENTS

  • BigBabaLou
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 6:48pm

    I've always found it interesting that there is a sign on that blue carrier vehicle that says "on loan from the Smithsonian"

  • Otakeb
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 6:47pm

    I recently shared this gallery, but seeing as how the Saturn V is getting some more attention on this sub's front page, I though I might share again.

    Here's the album of the photo's I took while visiting Johnson Space Center Houston about a week ago. Each picture has something written about the rocket commented in the description. The thing is an absolute marvel and I love that it's getting some attention.

    This is one of the last remaining Saturn Vs in the world, with only 2 others in existence. It is housed at the Houston Space Center, and was refurbished in 2001. Prior to that, it was stored outside were the Houston weather and humidity slowly corroded and degraded it. The restoration was a joint effort between the US Government, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Halliburton, and the Save America's Treasures Project.

    This and it's 2 sister rockets were originally planned to be used on Apollo 18, 19, and 20, but budget cuts due to civilian disinterest and the Vietnam War lead to the closure of the program and the unuse of the remaining Saturn V rockets.

    The brute force engineer of the Apollo program genuinely is one of humanities greatest accomplishments, in my opinion

  • mustang__1
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 6:59pm

    I've seen it in person. I felt like I appreciated it's size more in the imax doc that played last week.

    Nice pictures!

  • amplecactus
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 7:46pm

    how is JSC? I've been to KSC a couple times and am thinking JSC may be the next trip

● ● ●

Rocket Labs/NASA launch team mission patch for the ELaNa launch

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • lemonpjb
    7 points Mar 10,2019, 2:49pm

    This is the mission patch for the ELaNa (Educational Launch of Nanosatellites) cubesat package launch from last December. The package launched on Rocket Labs Electron rocket named This One's for Pickering after Sir William Pickering who was born in New Zealand, led the NASA team that developed the United States’ first satellite Explorer 1, and became director of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This flight was Rocket Lab’s first mission for NASA.

    I'm actually a contractor for Rocket Labs (my company builds some of the telemetry instruments they use) and I managed to snag one of these sweet patches from our contact there!

  • Znowmanting
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 4:52pm

    They gotta step up their embroidery game jeez

COMMENTS

  • lemonpjb
    7 points Mar 10,2019, 2:49pm

    This is the mission patch for the ELaNa (Educational Launch of Nanosatellites) cubesat package launch from last December. The package launched on Rocket Labs Electron rocket named This One's for Pickering after Sir William Pickering who was born in New Zealand, led the NASA team that developed the United States’ first satellite Explorer 1, and became director of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This flight was Rocket Lab’s first mission for NASA.

    I'm actually a contractor for Rocket Labs (my company builds some of the telemetry instruments they use) and I managed to snag one of these sweet patches from our contact there!

  • Znowmanting
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 4:52pm

    They gotta step up their embroidery game jeez

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My 40MP Image of The Small Magellanic Cloud

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • whyisthesky
    7 points Mar 10,2019, 10:55am

    It's hard to get a good sense of the resolution in this image due to its sheer size, even the compressed JPG is too large for reddit and the raw file is around 250MB. I've posted this data before but the processing to form this image is much improved, with greater colour accuracy and range as well as a more accurate sky background.

    The Small Magellanic Cloud is a dwarf galaxy orbiting our Milky Way visible in the southern hemisphere. Imaged here in RGB with H-Alpha data to show the faint nebulae in the galaxy's spine, the small magellanic cloud has around 3 billion stars in it.

    Also visible in the top right of the image is 47 Tucanae (https://i.imgur.com/znfJSvj.jpg), a globular cluster. Globular clusters are spherical groups of stars which orbit galaxies, generally they are comprised of much older stars compared to those in our galaxy. With a truncated main sequence and more developed red giant branch the majority of the stars in these clusters are a deep red colour.

  • FelipeKbcao
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 3:57pm

    Are we seeing actual individual (and very bright) stars belonging to the SMC or are those mostly just foreground noise stars from our own galaxy?

  • parthpatel96
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 5:03pm

    still blows my mind every dot is possibly another galaxy, similar to ours or probably even bigger but it’s just a little dot, in our eyes. awesome image!

COMMENTS

  • whyisthesky
    7 points Mar 10,2019, 10:55am

    It's hard to get a good sense of the resolution in this image due to its sheer size, even the compressed JPG is too large for reddit and the raw file is around 250MB. I've posted this data before but the processing to form this image is much improved, with greater colour accuracy and range as well as a more accurate sky background.

    The Small Magellanic Cloud is a dwarf galaxy orbiting our Milky Way visible in the southern hemisphere. Imaged here in RGB with H-Alpha data to show the faint nebulae in the galaxy's spine, the small magellanic cloud has around 3 billion stars in it.

    Also visible in the top right of the image is 47 Tucanae (https://i.imgur.com/znfJSvj.jpg), a globular cluster. Globular clusters are spherical groups of stars which orbit galaxies, generally they are comprised of much older stars compared to those in our galaxy. With a truncated main sequence and more developed red giant branch the majority of the stars in these clusters are a deep red colour.

  • FelipeKbcao
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 3:57pm

    Are we seeing actual individual (and very bright) stars belonging to the SMC or are those mostly just foreground noise stars from our own galaxy?

  • parthpatel96
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 5:03pm

    still blows my mind every dot is possibly another galaxy, similar to ours or probably even bigger but it’s just a little dot, in our eyes. awesome image!

  • drwillis86
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 1:47pm

    Home to Hala! Great pic! Higher, Further, Faster friend.

● ● ●

Your peace is well earned, Oppy. Rest.

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • Sup3rlum
    4 points Mar 10,2019, 2:55pm

    Oh my, where is this? I really wanna see an exhibit of spacecraft somewhere in London (besides the science musem)

  • Vault111Survivor
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 5:29pm

    I just hope I live long enough to see the day someone rescues it and sends it back on the next mars express flight.

  • beardingmesoftly
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 5:00pm

    I don't get why people humanize objects. It's like thanking a hammer for all its hard work.

COMMENTS

  • Sup3rlum
    4 points Mar 10,2019, 2:55pm

    Oh my, where is this? I really wanna see an exhibit of spacecraft somewhere in London (besides the science musem)

  • Vault111Survivor
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 5:29pm

    I just hope I live long enough to see the day someone rescues it and sends it back on the next mars express flight.

  • beardingmesoftly
    1 points Mar 10,2019, 5:00pm

    I don't get why people humanize objects. It's like thanking a hammer for all its hard work.