Space

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/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • Hellome118
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 9:16am

    On a recent trip to the Lake District I was lucky enough to be in one of England's few dark sites. (With a relatively clear sky)

    Taken using Lumix GX80 with a 25mm f1.7 lens. 5 second exposure at 6400 ISO. Got extremely lucky to capture the meteor, but the camera slipped at the last second.

    I was also able to capture Betelgeuse and Orion

COMMENTS

  • Hellome118
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 9:16am

    On a recent trip to the Lake District I was lucky enough to be in one of England's few dark sites. (With a relatively clear sky)

    Taken using Lumix GX80 with a 25mm f1.7 lens. 5 second exposure at 6400 ISO. Got extremely lucky to capture the meteor, but the camera slipped at the last second.

    I was also able to capture Betelgeuse and Orion

● ● ●

Orion Nebula, first attempt at photographing a nebula through my telescope!

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • backyardastrokiwi
    6 points Oct 06,2019, 2:36am

    The Great Orion Nebula

    This is my first nebula photographed through a telescope, any feedback is much appreciated!

    Location: Star Field, New Zealand

    Camera: Canon 550D

    Telescope: Skywatcher Quattro 200p

    Mount: EQ6R-Pro

    No guiding or filters were used.

    Software:

    Sequence Generator Pro

    Photoshop

    Deepskystacker

    Exposures:

    50x10s

    30x60s

    15x120s

    Total integrated time: 1hr 40 minutes

    Photoshop details:

    Each of the 3 stacked photos were edited in a similar way.

    • Stretched using repeating Curves and Levels.

    • Color Saturated for the individual colours of the nebula.

    • Astronomy Tool kit - Make Stars Smaller, Deep Space Noise Reduction, Space Noise Reduction, Local Contrast Enhancement.

    • Camera Raw Editor - Clarity and Noise Reduction.

    For more photos check me out on Instagram @backyardastrokiwi

  • sassmaster11
    2 points Oct 06,2019, 3:29am

    I don't really know about the technical side of this. But I can say aesthetically, GORGEOUS.

  • electroutlaw
    1 points Oct 06,2019, 4:10am

    I always find pictures like this fascinating. You have done an amazing job at capturing this picture.

COMMENTS

  • backyardastrokiwi
    6 points Oct 06,2019, 2:36am

    The Great Orion Nebula

    This is my first nebula photographed through a telescope, any feedback is much appreciated!

    Location: Star Field, New Zealand

    Camera: Canon 550D

    Telescope: Skywatcher Quattro 200p

    Mount: EQ6R-Pro

    No guiding or filters were used.

    Software:

    Sequence Generator Pro

    Photoshop

    Deepskystacker

    Exposures:

    50x10s

    30x60s

    15x120s

    Total integrated time: 1hr 40 minutes

    Photoshop details:

    Each of the 3 stacked photos were edited in a similar way.

    • Stretched using repeating Curves and Levels.

    • Color Saturated for the individual colours of the nebula.

    • Astronomy Tool kit - Make Stars Smaller, Deep Space Noise Reduction, Space Noise Reduction, Local Contrast Enhancement.

    • Camera Raw Editor - Clarity and Noise Reduction.

    For more photos check me out on Instagram @backyardastrokiwi

  • sassmaster11
    2 points Oct 06,2019, 3:29am

    I don't really know about the technical side of this. But I can say aesthetically, GORGEOUS.

  • electroutlaw
    1 points Oct 06,2019, 4:10am

    I always find pictures like this fascinating. You have done an amazing job at capturing this picture.

● ● ●

Happy International Observe the Moon Day! Not only is it a half-moon tonight, but Saturn is also in conjunction with the moon (close-by in the sky, around 2 o’ clock in relation to the moon)!

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • Idontlikecock
    1 points Oct 05,2019, 8:06pm

    I don't see Saturn at all in this image? Am I missing something?

  • JinaSensei
    1 points Oct 05,2019, 8:33pm

    Thanks for saying it is Saturn that is out. I was wondering and wanted to search for what planet it is.

COMMENTS

  • Idontlikecock
    1 points Oct 05,2019, 8:06pm

    I don't see Saturn at all in this image? Am I missing something?

  • JinaSensei
    1 points Oct 05,2019, 8:33pm

    Thanks for saying it is Saturn that is out. I was wondering and wanted to search for what planet it is.

● ● ●

I have a small piece of the Apollo 13 command module.

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • randomevenings
    21 points Sep 29,2019, 4:27am

    It's a tiny piece of kapton foil.

    https://i.imgur.com/LXiCKY9.jpg

    The foil was provided by NASA, but these pieces were distributed by the same people that do the mini museums.

    It's been to space, orbited the moon, and thankfully made it back.

    Have a couple other things.

    A piece of a mixtape used on Skylab.

    https://i.imgur.com/ssPxnR0.jpg

    Actual dust recovered from the asteroid belt.

    https://i.imgur.com/DDnD8cx.jpg

    A very tiny amount of preserved martian atmosphere.

    https://i.imgur.com/OOI0vmk.jpg

    Bonus because I think it's really cool since I remember the unique asthetic being unlike anything that came before, a small section of the original cray-1 super computer.

    https://i.imgur.com/iBHbRmT.jpg

  • SeudonymousKhan
    18 points Sep 29,2019, 5:40am

    This explains what went wrong. They needed that bit!

  • Kinda-Friendly
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 4:27am

    That’s wickedness

  • Leeuwarden-HF
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 4:52am

    That's awesome. A little piece of history. 👍

  • TheHigherCalling2
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 5:44am

    specktacular

  • whitewolfrevenge
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 4:34am

    Now much did it cost

  • frothiestyew
    0 points Sep 29,2019, 4:47am

    That is so cool

COMMENTS

  • randomevenings
    21 points Sep 29,2019, 4:27am

    It's a tiny piece of kapton foil.

    https://i.imgur.com/LXiCKY9.jpg

    The foil was provided by NASA, but these pieces were distributed by the same people that do the mini museums.

    It's been to space, orbited the moon, and thankfully made it back.

    Have a couple other things.

    A piece of a mixtape used on Skylab.

    https://i.imgur.com/ssPxnR0.jpg

    Actual dust recovered from the asteroid belt.

    https://i.imgur.com/DDnD8cx.jpg

    A very tiny amount of preserved martian atmosphere.

    https://i.imgur.com/OOI0vmk.jpg

    Bonus because I think it's really cool since I remember the unique asthetic being unlike anything that came before, a small section of the original cray-1 super computer.

    https://i.imgur.com/iBHbRmT.jpg

  • SeudonymousKhan
    18 points Sep 29,2019, 5:40am

    This explains what went wrong. They needed that bit!

  • Kinda-Friendly
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 4:27am

    That’s wickedness

  • Kryp85
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 4:44am

    I saw these. That's Frickin cool!

  • Leeuwarden-HF
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 4:52am

    That's awesome. A little piece of history. 👍

  • TheHigherCalling2
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 5:44am

    specktacular

  • whitewolfrevenge
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 4:34am

    Now much did it cost

  • frothiestyew
    0 points Sep 29,2019, 4:47am

    That is so cool

● ● ●

Full moon pic taken through my telescope

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • asoliz420
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 2:19pm

    My nieces think I am from the moon, orphaned by my moon parents to find a better life on earth.

  • formatt77
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 3:40pm

    Amazing .. what kit did you use please

COMMENTS

  • asoliz420
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 2:19pm

    My nieces think I am from the moon, orphaned by my moon parents to find a better life on earth.

  • formatt77
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 3:40pm

    Amazing .. what kit did you use please

● ● ●

We had a blackout here in Austria and my whole village was dark! I never saw those man's stars!

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • pizzapresident
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 6:37pm

    That man’s stars are legit. But seriously, awesome picture.

  • catonmyshoulder69
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 6:52pm

    We need to turn the GD street lights off once in a while.

  • JADELOVESGUS
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 7:02pm

    Does it look like a derpy fish to anyone else??

COMMENTS

  • pizzapresident
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 6:37pm

    That man’s stars are legit. But seriously, awesome picture.

  • catonmyshoulder69
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 6:52pm

    We need to turn the GD street lights off once in a while.

  • JADELOVESGUS
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 7:02pm

    Does it look like a derpy fish to anyone else??

  • IveComeToSayTheNword
    1 points Sep 29,2019, 7:28pm

    Look a little closer and you'll see the Milky Way (pretty dim, looks like a cloud)

● ● ●

Soyuz!

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • boxjellyblues
    2 points Sep 22,2019, 6:30am

    And the parasail Gemini test article behind. Must get back to the Space Centre, it's a while since I've been.

  • Vtran1082
    0 points Sep 22,2019, 9:57am

    Dang I thought this was going to be a Dr. Stone reference imao

COMMENTS

  • boxjellyblues
    2 points Sep 22,2019, 6:30am

    And the parasail Gemini test article behind. Must get back to the Space Centre, it's a while since I've been.

  • Vtran1082
    0 points Sep 22,2019, 9:57am

    Dang I thought this was going to be a Dr. Stone reference imao

● ● ●

A radio image of the beating heart of our galaxy, taken by MeerKAT.

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

COMMENTS

● ● ●

My 23.5hour exposure of the Eye of God (NGC 7293)

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • chiaros
    9 points Sep 22,2019, 10:46am

    You stopped just short. If you had gone for the full 24 hours you might have seen it blink.

  • Windston57
    12 points Sep 22,2019, 10:16am

    Is the Helix Nebula looking at you? No, not in any biological sense, but it does look quite like an eye. The Helix Nebula is so named because it also appears that you are looking down the axis of a helix. In actuality, it is now understood to have a surprisingly complex geometry, including radial filaments and extended outer loops. The Helix Nebula (aka NGC 7293) is one of brightest and closest examples of a planetary nebula, a gas cloud created at the end of the life of a Sun-like star. The remnant central stellar core, destined to become a white dwarf star, glows in light so energetic it causes the previously expelled gas to fluoresce. Source: APOD

    Shameless Plug. My Astrophotgraphy instagram


    Equipment:

    • Skywatcher 8" f/5 Newtonian w/ 2" moonlite focuser

    • Skywatcher NEQ6

    • ZWO ASI1600mm-c v3

    • ZWO ASI120mm

    • ZWO EFW

    • ZWO LRGB, 7nm Ha, Oiii, Sii

    • ZWO OAG

    • Baader mpcc mk3 coma corrector

    Acquisition

    • Ha - 57x900s

    • Oiii - 112x300s

    Total integration time - 23.5 hours

    Taken from Toowoomba, Australia. Bortle ~4

    Captured with N.I.N.A


    Processing

    • Combine flats, darks

    • Combine Masters

      • R: Ha
      • G: 0.5 (Oiii+Ha)
      • B: Oiii
    • Dynamic Background Extraction

    • Dynamic PSF

      • 25 stars
    • Range Mask

    • Star Mask

    • Deconvolution

      • 40 iterations
      • Deringing with star mask
    • John Rista's TGV Denoise

    • Stretch to non-linear

    • Local Histogram Transformation

    • Curves Transformation

      • Contrast
      • Saturation
    • Morphological Transformation


    Some really odd noise patterns in this image meant I had to throw away a good 10hours of extra ha data! Anyway, the processing was really really hard to bring out the really faint outer dust shells, probably the most challenging image I have ever processed, but it turned out not just too bad.

  • masondean73
    3 points Sep 22,2019, 12:39pm

    newbie here, how do you keep the camera/telescope pointed at it if the earth is spinning?

  • dentopod
    1 points Sep 22,2019, 12:19pm

    Looks a lot like the lights i see during deep meditation. Neat.

COMMENTS

  • chiaros
    9 points Sep 22,2019, 10:46am

    You stopped just short. If you had gone for the full 24 hours you might have seen it blink.

  • Windston57
    12 points Sep 22,2019, 10:16am

    Is the Helix Nebula looking at you? No, not in any biological sense, but it does look quite like an eye. The Helix Nebula is so named because it also appears that you are looking down the axis of a helix. In actuality, it is now understood to have a surprisingly complex geometry, including radial filaments and extended outer loops. The Helix Nebula (aka NGC 7293) is one of brightest and closest examples of a planetary nebula, a gas cloud created at the end of the life of a Sun-like star. The remnant central stellar core, destined to become a white dwarf star, glows in light so energetic it causes the previously expelled gas to fluoresce. Source: APOD

    Shameless Plug. My Astrophotgraphy instagram


    Equipment:

    • Skywatcher 8" f/5 Newtonian w/ 2" moonlite focuser

    • Skywatcher NEQ6

    • ZWO ASI1600mm-c v3

    • ZWO ASI120mm

    • ZWO EFW

    • ZWO LRGB, 7nm Ha, Oiii, Sii

    • ZWO OAG

    • Baader mpcc mk3 coma corrector

    Acquisition

    • Ha - 57x900s

    • Oiii - 112x300s

    Total integration time - 23.5 hours

    Taken from Toowoomba, Australia. Bortle ~4

    Captured with N.I.N.A


    Processing

    • Combine flats, darks

    • Combine Masters

      • R: Ha
      • G: 0.5 (Oiii+Ha)
      • B: Oiii
    • Dynamic Background Extraction

    • Dynamic PSF

      • 25 stars
    • Range Mask

    • Star Mask

    • Deconvolution

      • 40 iterations
      • Deringing with star mask
    • John Rista's TGV Denoise

    • Stretch to non-linear

    • Local Histogram Transformation

    • Curves Transformation

      • Contrast
      • Saturation
    • Morphological Transformation


    Some really odd noise patterns in this image meant I had to throw away a good 10hours of extra ha data! Anyway, the processing was really really hard to bring out the really faint outer dust shells, probably the most challenging image I have ever processed, but it turned out not just too bad.

  • masondean73
    3 points Sep 22,2019, 12:39pm

    newbie here, how do you keep the camera/telescope pointed at it if the earth is spinning?

  • Moriteourious
    1 points Sep 22,2019, 6:27pm

    Now this - this is what I would like a Sunday photo day to be - not some crappy Moon photos taken with a phone!

  • dentopod
    1 points Sep 22,2019, 12:19pm

    Looks a lot like the lights i see during deep meditation. Neat.

● ● ●

My 6 hour long exposure of the Andromeda Galaxy, taken from my apartment roof

/r/space: news, articles, images, videos, and discussion

COMMENTS

  • azzkicker7283
    20 points Sep 22,2019, 2:41pm

    Links to my

    | Setup | Instagram | Flickr |

    Seeing as though my only other Andromeda pic was just 10 minutes of DSLR data I decided to go after it again. Despite the heavy light pollution (I have direct line of sight to a football stadium, and the moon) I'm satisfied with the results. Captured on September 8th and 9th, 2019 from a bortle 7 zone.

     

    Equipment:

    • TPO 6" F/4 Imaging Newtonian

    • Orion Sirius EQ-G

    • ZWO ASI1600MM-Pro

    • Skywatcher Quattro Coma Corrector

    • ZWO EFW 8x1.25"/31mm

    • Astronomik LRGB+CLS Filters- 31mm

    • Astrodon 31mm Ha 5nm, Oiii 3nm

    • Agena 50mm Deluxe Straight-Through Guide Scope

    • ZWO ASI-120MC for guiding

    • Moonlite Autofocuser

    Acquisition: 6 hours 12 minutes (Camera at Unity Gain, -10°C)

    • CLS- 127x120"

    • Red- 37x60"

    • Green- 40x60"

    • Blue- 41x60"

    • Darks- 30

    • Flats- 30 per filter

    Capture Software:

    • EQMod mount control. Captured using N.I.N.A. and PHD2 for guiding and dithering.

    PixInsight Processing:

    • BatchPreProcessing

    • SubframeSelector

    • StarAlignment

    • Blink

    • ImageIntegration

    • DrizzleIntegration (2X, VarK 1.5)

    • DynamicCrop

    • DynamicBackgroundExtraction 2X (some gradients still made it through to the final image)

    • Luminance:

      • TVG/MMT Noise Reduction (Jon Rista Method)
      • ArcsinhStretch
      • HistogramTransformation
    • RGB

      • LinearFit to Green
      • ChannelCombination
      • BackgroundNeutralizatioin
      • ColorCalibration (PCC refused to plate solve the image, even though ImageSolver worked fine)
      • SCNR
      • HSV Repair
      • ArcsinhStretch
      • HistogramTransformation
      • Curve and HT adjustment to better match luminance stretch
      • LRGBCombination with luminance
    • CurveTransformations

    • DynamicBackgroundExtraction

    • More Curves

    • ACDNR

    • LocalHistogramEqualization

    • DarkStructureEnhance

    • MorphologicalTransformation to reduce star sizes

    • MMT Noise reduction (LHE brought out some larger scale noise)

    • Fast rotation 180 Degrees

    • Final curve and HT adjustments

    • Annotation

  • azzkicker7283
    10 points Sep 22,2019, 2:51pm
  • Tntn13
    1 points Sep 22,2019, 4:46pm

    I’m new here, How do you manage to pull off a 6hr long exposure on such a small spot in the sky given the earths rotation? What kind of setup is used?

  • hunmac9
    1 points Sep 22,2019, 8:23pm

    Great capture. I imaged M31 last night, but unfortunately my result isn't quite as great.

  • cornedbeef101
    1 points Sep 22,2019, 8:11pm

    I love the fact that the photons that hit the CCD to make most of this picture came from another galaxy, across the universe. What a trip they have had.

COMMENTS

  • azzkicker7283
    20 points Sep 22,2019, 2:41pm

    Links to my

    | Setup | Instagram | Flickr |

    Seeing as though my only other Andromeda pic was just 10 minutes of DSLR data I decided to go after it again. Despite the heavy light pollution (I have direct line of sight to a football stadium, and the moon) I'm satisfied with the results. Captured on September 8th and 9th, 2019 from a bortle 7 zone.

     

    Equipment:

    • TPO 6" F/4 Imaging Newtonian

    • Orion Sirius EQ-G

    • ZWO ASI1600MM-Pro

    • Skywatcher Quattro Coma Corrector

    • ZWO EFW 8x1.25"/31mm

    • Astronomik LRGB+CLS Filters- 31mm

    • Astrodon 31mm Ha 5nm, Oiii 3nm

    • Agena 50mm Deluxe Straight-Through Guide Scope

    • ZWO ASI-120MC for guiding

    • Moonlite Autofocuser

    Acquisition: 6 hours 12 minutes (Camera at Unity Gain, -10°C)

    • CLS- 127x120"

    • Red- 37x60"

    • Green- 40x60"

    • Blue- 41x60"

    • Darks- 30

    • Flats- 30 per filter

    Capture Software:

    • EQMod mount control. Captured using N.I.N.A. and PHD2 for guiding and dithering.

    PixInsight Processing:

    • BatchPreProcessing

    • SubframeSelector

    • StarAlignment

    • Blink

    • ImageIntegration

    • DrizzleIntegration (2X, VarK 1.5)

    • DynamicCrop

    • DynamicBackgroundExtraction 2X (some gradients still made it through to the final image)

    • Luminance:

      • TVG/MMT Noise Reduction (Jon Rista Method)
      • ArcsinhStretch
      • HistogramTransformation
    • RGB

      • LinearFit to Green
      • ChannelCombination
      • BackgroundNeutralizatioin
      • ColorCalibration (PCC refused to plate solve the image, even though ImageSolver worked fine)
      • SCNR
      • HSV Repair
      • ArcsinhStretch
      • HistogramTransformation
      • Curve and HT adjustment to better match luminance stretch
      • LRGBCombination with luminance
    • CurveTransformations

    • DynamicBackgroundExtraction

    • More Curves

    • ACDNR

    • LocalHistogramEqualization

    • DarkStructureEnhance

    • MorphologicalTransformation to reduce star sizes

    • MMT Noise reduction (LHE brought out some larger scale noise)

    • Fast rotation 180 Degrees

    • Final curve and HT adjustments

    • Annotation

  • azzkicker7283
    10 points Sep 22,2019, 2:51pm
  • Tntn13
    1 points Sep 22,2019, 4:46pm

    I’m new here, How do you manage to pull off a 6hr long exposure on such a small spot in the sky given the earths rotation? What kind of setup is used?

  • C137_Rick_Sanchez
    1 points Sep 22,2019, 7:58pm

    What's the smudge to the lower right of Andromeda? Is that one of its satellite galaxies?

  • hunmac9
    1 points Sep 22,2019, 8:23pm

    Great capture. I imaged M31 last night, but unfortunately my result isn't quite as great.

  • cornedbeef101
    1 points Sep 22,2019, 8:11pm

    I love the fact that the photons that hit the CCD to make most of this picture came from another galaxy, across the universe. What a trip they have had.