DIY

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Is the center support beam neccessary? And if so is there an alternative way to support the roof?

DIY

COMMENTS

  • yellowstonekelly
    20 points Jun 19,2019, 9:10am

    Yes.

    And no, not without extensive modifications.

  • jstamey
    15 points Jun 19,2019, 10:17am

    Typically beams are horizontal and columns are vertical. That said a beam is loaded primarily along its length and columns are loaded on their ends.

    The roof you’re showing is a ridge beam gable roof. This beam along the ridge supports the rafters. The ridge beam is supported by columns or by the gable wall itself. This design eliminates the need for ceiling rafters or rafter ties. You can eliminate the posts mid span by increasing the beam size but that’ll be tricky. And (please don’t take offense) if you’re asking questions about changing structure and don’t understand how the structure works contact a local professional to evaluate and determine a suitable and compliant solution.

  • thenoof
    27 points Jun 19,2019, 8:59am

    The structure you are showing here does not have the necessary truss support system to hold the roof up without the support beam reaching up from the floor. The triangles formed by the 'A shape' of the roof and the cross beams reaching across the width of your garage need to be filled with a lattice work of support beams. If you remove the the support, reaching from the floor of the garage up to the roof structure, your garage will collapse. Maybe not today. Maybe not tomorrow, but it will sag and finally cave in.

    Edit: You would need to re-engineer the entire roof to be able to have a floor space completely clear of support columns.

  • Dutch-Gouda
    6 points Jun 19,2019, 8:05am

    Is it correct that there is no beam supporting the beam you speak of?

  • Chagrinnish
    9 points Jun 19,2019, 8:33am

    The horizontal boards that are parallel to your rafters are rafter ties. The ones near the peak are collar ties. Both are required; the rafter ties prevent the walls from flexing outwards and the roof from collapsing flat.

  • Dutch-Gouda
    2 points Jun 19,2019, 9:21am

    Then i suppose it is a load bearing beam...

  • SavinBogey
    2 points Jun 19,2019, 9:28am

    Not sure which "beam" you're referring to. Beams are horizontal members and posts are vertical members.

  • StinkyMcShitzle
    3 points Jun 19,2019, 10:15am

    Consult an engineer that will come take a look at it. The easy answer is not necessarily, but you will have to change some structures in the way the roof is supported to fix it so it does not need that beam and post.

  • steveob42
    1 points Jun 19,2019, 11:50am

    I would leave it, it is notably stronger with it. Unless you are prepared to do a lot of maths and estimating, or higher a professional to tell you it is a bad idea,

  • zymurgyrules
    1 points Jun 19,2019, 7:19pm

    If you remove the center column the unsupported beam will be twice as long. To remove the center column would require the gable ends if the building to support more load. The center ridge beam will need to be stiffened considerably to keep from sagging without the center column. Google "structural engineer" and your zip code. Ask them how much a consultation would be. You are not going to get a complete answer from photos.

  • dave_890
    1 points Jun 19,2019, 8:34pm

    IANA structural engineer, but you could use 2x8 joists from wall to wall to tie the walls together. Use metal hangers. I'd also tie each of the roof beams halfway down their length, similar (but much better engineered) like that single horizontal board near the light going from one beam to the other. Use gusset plates for those.

    You could possibly use 2x10 joists from wall to wall, and run supports from each joist up to the roof beam.

    Visit a lumber yard and ask to see some of their engineered trusses. They'll give you an idea of how it needs to look to support the roof.

    Hire a pro. Also, consider starting over from the ground up with a garage that's up to spec and meets all your needs. That would be expensive, but it would be a "value-added" addition to your house.

  • Squeegee_House
    0 points Jun 19,2019, 12:15pm

    The structural integrity is necessary, but not that particular style.

    Edit: found a picture of different styles for you

    https://images.app.goo.gl/pLeSPFS5iNM6G3VY8

  • jakejakejake86
    0 points Jun 19,2019, 12:32pm

    U would need to run a new ridge beam way bigger to span gable to gable without that center post.. that is a Monster span it would need to be engineered steel truss most likely.

  • Dutch-Gouda
    -2 points Jun 19,2019, 8:08am

    Because if there were a load on that beam Y (vertical) the beams that support them (beams that are horizontal i call them X) will bend downward. So i don’t think it is supporting much.

COMMENTS

  • yellowstonekelly
    20 points Jun 19,2019, 9:10am

    Yes.

    And no, not without extensive modifications.

  • jstamey
    15 points Jun 19,2019, 10:17am

    Typically beams are horizontal and columns are vertical. That said a beam is loaded primarily along its length and columns are loaded on their ends.

    The roof you’re showing is a ridge beam gable roof. This beam along the ridge supports the rafters. The ridge beam is supported by columns or by the gable wall itself. This design eliminates the need for ceiling rafters or rafter ties. You can eliminate the posts mid span by increasing the beam size but that’ll be tricky. And (please don’t take offense) if you’re asking questions about changing structure and don’t understand how the structure works contact a local professional to evaluate and determine a suitable and compliant solution.

  • thenoof
    27 points Jun 19,2019, 8:59am

    The structure you are showing here does not have the necessary truss support system to hold the roof up without the support beam reaching up from the floor. The triangles formed by the 'A shape' of the roof and the cross beams reaching across the width of your garage need to be filled with a lattice work of support beams. If you remove the the support, reaching from the floor of the garage up to the roof structure, your garage will collapse. Maybe not today. Maybe not tomorrow, but it will sag and finally cave in.

    Edit: You would need to re-engineer the entire roof to be able to have a floor space completely clear of support columns.

  • spuds1144
    9 points Jun 19,2019, 10:48am

    Consulting with a structural engineer or architect is the smart money wise play here.

  • Dutch-Gouda
    6 points Jun 19,2019, 8:05am

    Is it correct that there is no beam supporting the beam you speak of?

  • Chagrinnish
    9 points Jun 19,2019, 8:33am

    The horizontal boards that are parallel to your rafters are rafter ties. The ones near the peak are collar ties. Both are required; the rafter ties prevent the walls from flexing outwards and the roof from collapsing flat.

  • Dutch-Gouda
    2 points Jun 19,2019, 9:21am

    Then i suppose it is a load bearing beam...

  • SavinBogey
    2 points Jun 19,2019, 9:28am

    Not sure which "beam" you're referring to. Beams are horizontal members and posts are vertical members.

  • StinkyMcShitzle
    3 points Jun 19,2019, 10:15am

    Consult an engineer that will come take a look at it. The easy answer is not necessarily, but you will have to change some structures in the way the roof is supported to fix it so it does not need that beam and post.

  • steveob42
    1 points Jun 19,2019, 11:50am

    I would leave it, it is notably stronger with it. Unless you are prepared to do a lot of maths and estimating, or higher a professional to tell you it is a bad idea,

  • zymurgyrules
    1 points Jun 19,2019, 7:19pm

    If you remove the center column the unsupported beam will be twice as long. To remove the center column would require the gable ends if the building to support more load. The center ridge beam will need to be stiffened considerably to keep from sagging without the center column. Google "structural engineer" and your zip code. Ask them how much a consultation would be. You are not going to get a complete answer from photos.

  • dave_890
    1 points Jun 19,2019, 8:34pm

    IANA structural engineer, but you could use 2x8 joists from wall to wall to tie the walls together. Use metal hangers. I'd also tie each of the roof beams halfway down their length, similar (but much better engineered) like that single horizontal board near the light going from one beam to the other. Use gusset plates for those.

    You could possibly use 2x10 joists from wall to wall, and run supports from each joist up to the roof beam.

    Visit a lumber yard and ask to see some of their engineered trusses. They'll give you an idea of how it needs to look to support the roof.

    Hire a pro. Also, consider starting over from the ground up with a garage that's up to spec and meets all your needs. That would be expensive, but it would be a "value-added" addition to your house.

  • Squeegee_House
    0 points Jun 19,2019, 12:15pm

    The structural integrity is necessary, but not that particular style.

    Edit: found a picture of different styles for you

    https://images.app.goo.gl/pLeSPFS5iNM6G3VY8

  • jakejakejake86
    0 points Jun 19,2019, 12:32pm

    U would need to run a new ridge beam way bigger to span gable to gable without that center post.. that is a Monster span it would need to be engineered steel truss most likely.

  • Dutch-Gouda
    -2 points Jun 19,2019, 8:08am

    Because if there were a load on that beam Y (vertical) the beams that support them (beams that are horizontal i call them X) will bend downward. So i don’t think it is supporting much.

● ● ●

Does anyone have any good tricks to remove the old caulking that the previous home owner jammed in this sliding bathroom door??

DIY

COMMENTS

  • queenofpaint
    5 points Jun 16,2019, 4:01pm

    Mineral spirits, or paint thinner will soften it. Pry it off with a screwdriver.

  • Oblongmind420
    4 points Jun 16,2019, 5:00pm

    I googled it for you. Try krud kutter caulk remover or goo gone, and you can find both at Lowes or home depot. Or acetone, paint thinner, mineral spirits as well.

  • BluntSharpness
    3 points Jun 16,2019, 4:01pm

    Uggg that’s gonna be a pain in the ass to get out ... I’m not sure if there are any tricks but I once spent a great deal of time scraping that shit off with any blade I could find.

  • LegumeAbacus
    3 points Jun 16,2019, 4:15pm

    I recently had to deal with a similar situation. I ended up disassembling and removing the entire four-piece aluminum frame, cleaning the silicone mess off the tile surround with plain old razor blades, and using a combination of a plastic scraper, 5-in-one paint tool, acetone, and elbow grease to clean up the frame pieces before reinstalling and re-sealing the whole thing. It was a complete pain in the behind and took an entire day of 45-minute HiiW ("high-intensity interval work"), but the new/properly-applied caulking came out great and my shower/tub no longer develops black crud in the corners and seams between cleanings. Ooof.

    Edit: Vinegar and isopropyl alcohol will also soften silicone caulk. It's best to saturate a bunch of cotton balls, smash them against the trouble spots, cover with a bit of plastic wrap, and let sit for an hour or two before busting out the scraper.

  • DaPant
    3 points Jun 16,2019, 4:43pm

    Drown it in apple vinegar over night, scrape it off with some sort of blade/flat screwdriver in the morning

  • pmpalmiero
    2 points Jun 16,2019, 4:01pm

    A small, plastic scraper. Something that you’d use to remove a car’s door panel.

  • BluntSharpness
    2 points Jun 16,2019, 4:06pm

    I wonder if there are any household liquids or cleaners that’ll soften it up and make it easier to scrape off... my experience with this was way back before google so I just had to wing it ..

  • hipdogjacksix
    2 points Jun 16,2019, 4:07pm

    Flat screw driver and a knife

  • baldingdad81
    2 points Jun 16,2019, 4:24pm

    Simply a bit of patience may be best, with a sharp blade. Thinners etc might make it easier, but may also soften it & cause a worse sticky mess!

    All the tools/solvents available to remove silicon, I still always use a craft blade almost flat to the surface.

  • s_w_eek
    1 points Jun 16,2019, 4:31pm

    upside down compressed air can and small chisel

  • there_I-said-it
    1 points Jun 16,2019, 4:00pm

    You can buy products that dissolve caulking but it might depend on what kind of caulking it is.

COMMENTS

  • queenofpaint
    5 points Jun 16,2019, 4:01pm

    Mineral spirits, or paint thinner will soften it. Pry it off with a screwdriver.

  • Oblongmind420
    4 points Jun 16,2019, 5:00pm

    I googled it for you. Try krud kutter caulk remover or goo gone, and you can find both at Lowes or home depot. Or acetone, paint thinner, mineral spirits as well.

  • BluntSharpness
    3 points Jun 16,2019, 4:01pm

    Uggg that’s gonna be a pain in the ass to get out ... I’m not sure if there are any tricks but I once spent a great deal of time scraping that shit off with any blade I could find.

  • frecklesforfun
    3 points Jun 16,2019, 4:12pm

    Paint scraper and hair dryer.

    If you want to use a shower curtain, those sliding doors come off pretty easy. Took mine down on our old 1930’s bath & it made a world of difference.

  • LegumeAbacus
    3 points Jun 16,2019, 4:15pm

    I recently had to deal with a similar situation. I ended up disassembling and removing the entire four-piece aluminum frame, cleaning the silicone mess off the tile surround with plain old razor blades, and using a combination of a plastic scraper, 5-in-one paint tool, acetone, and elbow grease to clean up the frame pieces before reinstalling and re-sealing the whole thing. It was a complete pain in the behind and took an entire day of 45-minute HiiW ("high-intensity interval work"), but the new/properly-applied caulking came out great and my shower/tub no longer develops black crud in the corners and seams between cleanings. Ooof.

    Edit: Vinegar and isopropyl alcohol will also soften silicone caulk. It's best to saturate a bunch of cotton balls, smash them against the trouble spots, cover with a bit of plastic wrap, and let sit for an hour or two before busting out the scraper.

  • DaPant
    3 points Jun 16,2019, 4:43pm

    Drown it in apple vinegar over night, scrape it off with some sort of blade/flat screwdriver in the morning

  • pmpalmiero
    2 points Jun 16,2019, 4:01pm

    A small, plastic scraper. Something that you’d use to remove a car’s door panel.

  • BluntSharpness
    2 points Jun 16,2019, 4:06pm

    I wonder if there are any household liquids or cleaners that’ll soften it up and make it easier to scrape off... my experience with this was way back before google so I just had to wing it ..

  • hipdogjacksix
    2 points Jun 16,2019, 4:07pm

    Flat screw driver and a knife

  • baldingdad81
    2 points Jun 16,2019, 4:24pm

    Simply a bit of patience may be best, with a sharp blade. Thinners etc might make it easier, but may also soften it & cause a worse sticky mess!

    All the tools/solvents available to remove silicon, I still always use a craft blade almost flat to the surface.

  • s_w_eek
    1 points Jun 16,2019, 4:31pm

    upside down compressed air can and small chisel

  • there_I-said-it
    1 points Jun 16,2019, 4:00pm

    You can buy products that dissolve caulking but it might depend on what kind of caulking it is.

● ● ●

What is this flooring? Do I need an underlayment for vinyl flooring on top?

DIY

COMMENTS

  • SarcasmIsMyFont
    6 points Jun 14,2019, 7:42pm

    Peel and stick vinyl flooring.

    Depending on age there is an obligatory asbestos warning for that stuff.

    If you go right over it with vinyl flooring, your adhesion is only as good as what it’s adhered to. Most would either pull this crap up or lay a wood underlay over it for a fresh floor to assure best results if you don’t mind the extra height.

  • rphillips11
    5 points Jun 14,2019, 7:38pm

    It’s vinyl tile composition, VTC. clean it and go right over it.

  • Ma5ter5hake
    3 points Jun 14,2019, 7:41pm

    That right there is your standard 1x1 all purpose elementary classroom paint right over it floor. You can paint right over it, as it says in the name.

  • RaistlinAround
    2 points Jun 14,2019, 7:51pm

    What is the size of the tiles and the age of the building?

  • Kirbyderby3974
    1 points Jun 14,2019, 7:40pm

    Those are those sticky tiles. Linoleum. They are stuck on with adhesive. Should be able to glue something to them. They were used a lot in the sixties.

  • Caesar95
    -1 points Jun 14,2019, 7:38pm

    Looks like Italian Carrara marble flooring to me

COMMENTS

  • SarcasmIsMyFont
    6 points Jun 14,2019, 7:42pm

    Peel and stick vinyl flooring.

    Depending on age there is an obligatory asbestos warning for that stuff.

    If you go right over it with vinyl flooring, your adhesion is only as good as what it’s adhered to. Most would either pull this crap up or lay a wood underlay over it for a fresh floor to assure best results if you don’t mind the extra height.

  • rphillips11
    5 points Jun 14,2019, 7:38pm

    It’s vinyl tile composition, VTC. clean it and go right over it.

  • Ma5ter5hake
    3 points Jun 14,2019, 7:41pm

    That right there is your standard 1x1 all purpose elementary classroom paint right over it floor. You can paint right over it, as it says in the name.

  • Wordy-Girl
    2 points Jun 14,2019, 7:47pm

    Looks like commercial grade vinyl squares, very hard to get up. We had some in a house and the tile person said go over it.

  • RaistlinAround
    2 points Jun 14,2019, 7:51pm

    What is the size of the tiles and the age of the building?

  • Kirbyderby3974
    1 points Jun 14,2019, 7:40pm

    Those are those sticky tiles. Linoleum. They are stuck on with adhesive. Should be able to glue something to them. They were used a lot in the sixties.

  • Caesar95
    -1 points Jun 14,2019, 7:38pm

    Looks like Italian Carrara marble flooring to me

● ● ●

Best way to remove paint from the metal and not wood?

DIY

COMMENTS

  • Seth7666
    76 points Jun 13,2019, 12:04pm

    Go back in time and put some tape on the metal parts before you start painting 👍. You're welcome!

  • PaPaw85713
    18 points Jun 13,2019, 12:08pm

    If it's latex, use alcohol. Mask the wood.

  • jimmysrobot
    15 points Jun 13,2019, 12:01pm

    Don’t wire brush that. You will eff up the galvanized coating, and then your white fence will get stained with rust

  • Branlovemuffin
    8 points Jun 13,2019, 12:00pm

    Get a piece of aluminum flashing and slide it between the pole and the wood. The flashing will protect the wood and you can pretty much use anything you want at that point. (Just a thought. I’m sure there are easier ways)

  • baggar11
    4 points Jun 13,2019, 12:27pm

    lacquer thinner

  • baileydog85
    5 points Jun 13,2019, 12:28pm

    Razor blade

  • RESERVA42
    3 points Jun 13,2019, 1:15pm

    Goof Off works well in my experience. Paper towers, nitrile gloves, and Goof Off.

  • clearly_hyperbole
    6 points Jun 13,2019, 12:26pm

    Razor blade

  • KronyZ71
    2 points Jun 13,2019, 12:36pm

    Lacquer thinner and elbow grease. Perhaps a plastic scraper after you give some scrubs with the thinner.

  • Unanimous_Seps
    2 points Jun 13,2019, 2:47pm

    99% isopropyl alcohol and a green pad should make quick work of it.

    Avoid alcohol less however; 70% is only medical grade (no aggressive enough) and 91% doesn't flash off quick enough, leaving etching depending on material/coat.

  • Marc66FR
    2 points Jun 13,2019, 4:19pm

    Leave it like this. Paint will eventually come off from galvanised steel

  • nuevallorker
    2 points Jun 13,2019, 5:40pm

    Heat gun

  • bainpr
    3 points Jun 13,2019, 3:56pm

    The proper way in my opinion would be to detach the wood from the metal post then clean the post. May take a wrench or s screw driver but shouldn't be to difficult. If you send some more pics i can give you better directions.

  • MrSnoozen
    2 points Jun 13,2019, 11:59am

    Acetone

  • greymud
    2 points Jun 13,2019, 1:04pm

    Paint the rest of the metal?

    /s

  • Otis2341
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 11:59am

    Scraper

  • LittleJohnStone
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 1:53pm

    Use a utility knife to cut the paint webs between wood and metal, then use a scraper on a hot day to peel it up.

  • WangusRex
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 4:23pm

    Couple layers of plain old blue painters tape or masking tape on the wood. Power wash metal.

  • digital_janitor
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 4:44pm

    Mask and pressure wash?

  • nuevallorker
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 5:39pm

    Heat gun

  • BetaTestedYourMom
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 6:36pm

    Get silver paint for the pole, you'll probably get it on the wood though, you'll eventually get tired of the back and forth cycle. Eventually learn you suck at painting and should try painters tape. Here you'll break the cycle and have a great paint job on both.

  • wolframore
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 2:17pm

    Silver paint for fence, just don’t get it on the wood.

  • sarcasticallyabusive
    0 points Jun 13,2019, 12:06pm

    paint remover and a q tip if you need to be precise.

    or just get more white paint ready for afterwards, and wirebrush that mofo. but it will fuck up the galvanized coating as mentioned

  • jake1991jake
    -2 points Jun 13,2019, 11:55am

    I use my dremel with a little wire brush

  • Sparkly_Fish
    -4 points Jun 13,2019, 11:58am

    Wire brush should take care of it.

COMMENTS

  • Seth7666
    76 points Jun 13,2019, 12:04pm

    Go back in time and put some tape on the metal parts before you start painting 👍. You're welcome!

  • PaPaw85713
    18 points Jun 13,2019, 12:08pm

    If it's latex, use alcohol. Mask the wood.

  • jimmysrobot
    15 points Jun 13,2019, 12:01pm

    Don’t wire brush that. You will eff up the galvanized coating, and then your white fence will get stained with rust

  • SgtGears
    6 points Jun 13,2019, 12:04pm

    Masking tape on the wood, then use something like acetone to clean the paint off the metal.

  • Branlovemuffin
    8 points Jun 13,2019, 12:00pm

    Get a piece of aluminum flashing and slide it between the pole and the wood. The flashing will protect the wood and you can pretty much use anything you want at that point. (Just a thought. I’m sure there are easier ways)

  • baggar11
    4 points Jun 13,2019, 12:27pm

    lacquer thinner

  • baileydog85
    5 points Jun 13,2019, 12:28pm

    Razor blade

  • RESERVA42
    3 points Jun 13,2019, 1:15pm

    Goof Off works well in my experience. Paper towers, nitrile gloves, and Goof Off.

  • clearly_hyperbole
    6 points Jun 13,2019, 12:26pm

    Razor blade

  • KronyZ71
    2 points Jun 13,2019, 12:36pm

    Lacquer thinner and elbow grease. Perhaps a plastic scraper after you give some scrubs with the thinner.

  • Unanimous_Seps
    2 points Jun 13,2019, 2:47pm

    99% isopropyl alcohol and a green pad should make quick work of it.

    Avoid alcohol less however; 70% is only medical grade (no aggressive enough) and 91% doesn't flash off quick enough, leaving etching depending on material/coat.

  • Marc66FR
    2 points Jun 13,2019, 4:19pm

    Leave it like this. Paint will eventually come off from galvanised steel

  • nuevallorker
    2 points Jun 13,2019, 5:40pm

    Heat gun

  • bainpr
    3 points Jun 13,2019, 3:56pm

    The proper way in my opinion would be to detach the wood from the metal post then clean the post. May take a wrench or s screw driver but shouldn't be to difficult. If you send some more pics i can give you better directions.

  • MrSnoozen
    2 points Jun 13,2019, 11:59am

    Acetone

  • greymud
    2 points Jun 13,2019, 1:04pm

    Paint the rest of the metal?

    /s

  • Otis2341
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 11:59am

    Scraper

  • LittleJohnStone
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 1:53pm

    Use a utility knife to cut the paint webs between wood and metal, then use a scraper on a hot day to peel it up.

  • WangusRex
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 4:23pm

    Couple layers of plain old blue painters tape or masking tape on the wood. Power wash metal.

  • digital_janitor
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 4:44pm

    Mask and pressure wash?

  • nuevallorker
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 5:39pm

    Heat gun

  • BetaTestedYourMom
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 6:36pm

    Get silver paint for the pole, you'll probably get it on the wood though, you'll eventually get tired of the back and forth cycle. Eventually learn you suck at painting and should try painters tape. Here you'll break the cycle and have a great paint job on both.

  • wolframore
    1 points Jun 13,2019, 2:17pm

    Silver paint for fence, just don’t get it on the wood.

  • sarcasticallyabusive
    0 points Jun 13,2019, 12:06pm

    paint remover and a q tip if you need to be precise.

    or just get more white paint ready for afterwards, and wirebrush that mofo. but it will fuck up the galvanized coating as mentioned

  • jake1991jake
    -2 points Jun 13,2019, 11:55am

    I use my dremel with a little wire brush

  • Sparkly_Fish
    -4 points Jun 13,2019, 11:58am

    Wire brush should take care of it.

● ● ●

How do I get this drain cap off??

DIY

COMMENTS

  • jktlinuxguy
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:12pm

    Try unscrewing the cap on-top (turning to the left). You might have to hold the larger part in order to get the cap to turn. Once the cap is off, you will hopefully uncover a screw in the middle. Unscrewing that should allow you to remove the drain.

  • TxRxCash
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:14pm

    There is an Allen screw under the lip that you have to back out.

  • rben93
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:17pm

    Push down and unscrew going counter clock wise might need channel locks / pliers

  • UseThisOne2
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:11pm

    Keep turning counter clockwise... it’s fine threads and you need to keep turning.

  • lazynstupid
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:15pm

    Righty-tighty-lefty-loosey

  • MrMadrona
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:35pm

    Crowbar should do it.

  • rlhred
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:44pm

    dynamite

  • Zeropoint45
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:10pm

    You don't. It screws down to close and screw up to open.

COMMENTS

  • jktlinuxguy
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:12pm

    Try unscrewing the cap on-top (turning to the left). You might have to hold the larger part in order to get the cap to turn. Once the cap is off, you will hopefully uncover a screw in the middle. Unscrewing that should allow you to remove the drain.

  • TxRxCash
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:14pm

    There is an Allen screw under the lip that you have to back out.

  • rben93
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:17pm

    Push down and unscrew going counter clock wise might need channel locks / pliers

  • Jeffyhere43
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:11pm

    I think the handle screws off

  • UseThisOne2
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:11pm

    Keep turning counter clockwise... it’s fine threads and you need to keep turning.

  • lazynstupid
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:15pm

    Righty-tighty-lefty-loosey

  • MrMadrona
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:35pm

    Crowbar should do it.

  • rlhred
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:44pm

    dynamite

  • Zeropoint45
    1 points Jun 06,2019, 8:10pm

    You don't. It screws down to close and screw up to open.

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[Help] what are these called? Trying to DIY some pull bar handles for dresser. Please. Help.

DIY

COMMENTS

  • SRxRed
    3 points Jun 04,2019, 2:52pm

    Ring pieces. Just go to the hardware store and ask for ring pieces.

COMMENTS

  • SRxRed
    3 points Jun 04,2019, 2:52pm

    Ring pieces. Just go to the hardware store and ask for ring pieces.

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Garage Roof Truss Broken

DIY

COMMENTS

  • jlenko
    8 points May 09,2019, 1:32am

    Sister that 2x4 stat!

  • roy20050
    3 points May 09,2019, 4:38am

    Sistering the truss can be done this guy does an okay job showing how he did it.

  • brichar62
    3 points May 09,2019, 7:20am

    Jack it straight and bolt a steel cradle to it.

  • robiscoach
    1 points May 09,2019, 1:50am

    You need to get an Afro under there as soon as possible to take the weight. Get a builder in and they have two options, to try and fix the hoist that is already there, or to replace it. This will depend on what has caused it to break. An RSJ might be a better option, depending on the gross weight being held up by the current hoist. Hope this helps.

  • waronu
    1 points May 09,2019, 11:26am

    Sandwich the broken truss between 2 2x4 as long a length as u can get on each side. Little bit of construction adhesive and a hand full of nails. Straighten it out as much as u can. Not uncommon when your framing a house to get a broken truss. Truss manufacturer always details this when u ask for a fix. 20 years as a carpenter, easy peasy.

  • BileFire
    1 points May 09,2019, 12:11pm

    Thanks all for replies. After reading them all seems to come back to 2 options if I go DIY route.

    1) 2x4s long as possible, glue, and construction grade screws on each side.

    2) Steel bracing. I found this: https://www.homedepot.com/p/FastCap-3-1-2-in-W-x-24-in-L-x-3-8-in-T-Black-HD-Stealth-Speed-Brace-FC-SB-24HDSTEALTHBL/301943189

    I would think Option 2 woild be stronger overall but adding 3/8" steel to each side would be a trade off with extra weight. I could use grade 8 fasteners to bolt it up.

    What's everyone thoughts?

  • cheeseshrice1966
    -2 points May 09,2019, 1:35am

    First thing you need to do is contact the contractor that built the garage and find out if the trusses were manufactured or built by the contractor.

    Maybe call your insurance company and let them handle it- they’re going to want to get to the bottom of it and get it repaired so it doesn’t cost them twice as much to repair damage done if the truss deteriorates and causes issues.

  • cowboysplaya
    -2 points May 09,2019, 8:39am

    Just leave it, truss me it won’t break.

COMMENTS

  • jlenko
    8 points May 09,2019, 1:32am

    Sister that 2x4 stat!

  • roy20050
    3 points May 09,2019, 4:38am

    Sistering the truss can be done this guy does an okay job showing how he did it.

  • brichar62
    3 points May 09,2019, 7:20am

    Jack it straight and bolt a steel cradle to it.

  • BileFire
    1 points May 09,2019, 1:33am

    Okay backstory. Moved in last June. I wanted more Garage storage because of family reasons. I was interested in doing overhead garage door storage, but didn't want to overload my roof trusses. I went up to check layout and found they were your standard 2x4s with metal plates. So since I already have drywall, insulation, and garage door opener decided against extra weight of storage. While accessing situation and moving extra pieces of siding around I noticed one had a break. I assume it was where they cut a vent and hammered the crap out of it cause the cut isn't even clean on one side.

    Can I fix this with 2x6 on each side? I'd only have room for 18" or so on each side of the break.

  • robiscoach
    1 points May 09,2019, 1:50am

    You need to get an Afro under there as soon as possible to take the weight. Get a builder in and they have two options, to try and fix the hoist that is already there, or to replace it. This will depend on what has caused it to break. An RSJ might be a better option, depending on the gross weight being held up by the current hoist. Hope this helps.

  • waronu
    1 points May 09,2019, 11:26am

    Sandwich the broken truss between 2 2x4 as long a length as u can get on each side. Little bit of construction adhesive and a hand full of nails. Straighten it out as much as u can. Not uncommon when your framing a house to get a broken truss. Truss manufacturer always details this when u ask for a fix. 20 years as a carpenter, easy peasy.

  • BileFire
    1 points May 09,2019, 12:11pm

    Thanks all for replies. After reading them all seems to come back to 2 options if I go DIY route.

    1) 2x4s long as possible, glue, and construction grade screws on each side.

    2) Steel bracing. I found this: https://www.homedepot.com/p/FastCap-3-1-2-in-W-x-24-in-L-x-3-8-in-T-Black-HD-Stealth-Speed-Brace-FC-SB-24HDSTEALTHBL/301943189

    I would think Option 2 woild be stronger overall but adding 3/8" steel to each side would be a trade off with extra weight. I could use grade 8 fasteners to bolt it up.

    What's everyone thoughts?

  • cheeseshrice1966
    -2 points May 09,2019, 1:35am

    First thing you need to do is contact the contractor that built the garage and find out if the trusses were manufactured or built by the contractor.

    Maybe call your insurance company and let them handle it- they’re going to want to get to the bottom of it and get it repaired so it doesn’t cost them twice as much to repair damage done if the truss deteriorates and causes issues.

  • cowboysplaya
    -2 points May 09,2019, 8:39am

    Just leave it, truss me it won’t break.

● ● ●

Help! Watermarks on high gloss melamine countertop

DIY

COMMENTS

  • Just4TodayIthink
    1 points May 04,2019, 8:22pm

    Coasters

  • Yogiktor
    1 points May 04,2019, 8:50pm

    Vinegar?

COMMENTS

  • Just4TodayIthink
    1 points May 04,2019, 8:22pm

    Coasters

  • Yogiktor
    1 points May 04,2019, 8:50pm

    Vinegar?

● ● ●

When I open the valve to my garden hose it leaks, a lot. The other side of the valve also appears to go outside of the house so I'm not sure how to switch it off. Might I be able to just pop the valve out and replace it, or do I have to cut it out?

DIY

COMMENTS

  • FredZeplin
    2 points Apr 21,2019, 1:32pm

    The red handled ball valve is leaking? Or the larger pipe in front?

  • BucketOfGoldSoundz
    1 points Apr 21,2019, 3:32pm

    Yeah if you’re talking about the red pvc valve, you will need to cut it out and replace it.

  • Deathbyclick
    1 points Apr 21,2019, 8:32pm

    Just turn off the main water line. Always safest thing to do.

COMMENTS

  • FredZeplin
    2 points Apr 21,2019, 1:32pm

    The red handled ball valve is leaking? Or the larger pipe in front?

  • BucketOfGoldSoundz
    1 points Apr 21,2019, 3:32pm

    Yeah if you’re talking about the red pvc valve, you will need to cut it out and replace it.

  • Deathbyclick
    1 points Apr 21,2019, 8:32pm

    Just turn off the main water line. Always safest thing to do.

● ● ●

LPT: Insecticide sprayer makes a good water source for camping, cleaning etc

DIY

COMMENTS

  • LuckySmock
    6 points Apr 19,2019, 3:02pm

    Yeah just don't run chemical through it first.

  • IndianaGnomes
    2 points Apr 19,2019, 4:28pm

    We used to use that to clean the grills every night at McDonald's.

  • Christophah
    2 points Apr 19,2019, 4:31pm

    Someones dad brought one of those to a field day when I was a kid to mist kids to keep them cool, got some funny looks before explaining

COMMENTS

  • LuckySmock
    6 points Apr 19,2019, 3:02pm

    Yeah just don't run chemical through it first.

  • IndianaGnomes
    2 points Apr 19,2019, 4:28pm

    We used to use that to clean the grills every night at McDonald's.

  • Christophah
    2 points Apr 19,2019, 4:31pm

    Someones dad brought one of those to a field day when I was a kid to mist kids to keep them cool, got some funny looks before explaining

  • dv4der
    3 points Apr 19,2019, 3:02pm

    Not a DIY but a repurpose. I bought a brand new insecticide sprayer so it can be a water pump and spray off my gear when I go to the beach and camping