DIY

Page 1 of 16

How do I get the rest of this paint off that's stuck in the wood grain?

DIY

COMMENTS

  • Slimfit0810
    6 points Oct 22,2019, 9:54pm

    Dads. That stuff will get it out.

  • zut_alorsalors
    3 points Oct 22,2019, 9:34pm

    Paint stripper is designed for that...sanding may have pushed some pigment deeper though.

  • GrubbyScrub
    2 points Oct 22,2019, 9:22pm

    sandpaper

  • Braincrash77
    2 points Oct 22,2019, 10:46pm

    It must be a pretty deep grain. If you can live with it, it doesn’t look that bad. In fact it looks cool.

  • Marpets1
    1 points Oct 22,2019, 9:38pm

    If you want it all gone, chemical paint stripper is your only choice. Better to have done it first before sanding, though.

  • Desdraftlit
    1 points Oct 23,2019, 8:47am

    Visit /powerwashingporn

  • Ive_Got_Cheese
    1 points Oct 23,2019, 5:55pm

    Could you give it a coat of wood stain?

  • rgliberty
    1 points Oct 23,2019, 7:15pm

    Why does your Halloween costume require a completely stripped bat?

  • GrubbyScrub
    0 points Oct 22,2019, 9:34pm

    lightly but yes keep at it

COMMENTS

  • Slimfit0810
    6 points Oct 22,2019, 9:54pm

    Dads. That stuff will get it out.

  • zut_alorsalors
    3 points Oct 22,2019, 9:34pm

    Paint stripper is designed for that...sanding may have pushed some pigment deeper though.

  • GrubbyScrub
    2 points Oct 22,2019, 9:22pm

    sandpaper

  • jorsully
    2 points Oct 22,2019, 9:23pm

    I'm trying to make a baseball bat for a Halloween costume. I found this bat at Goodwill with blue flaky paint, and figured that it would be easy enough to remove.

    I sanded it quite a bit, but was left with blue paint stuck in the grain. I checked Google, and ended up rubbing some Goof Off on it and scrubbing with steel wool. It helped a little bit, but not much.

    I live in a studio apartment, so I have limited access to tools. Would anything work that I could just pick up at the store? Thanks!

  • Braincrash77
    2 points Oct 22,2019, 10:46pm

    It must be a pretty deep grain. If you can live with it, it doesn’t look that bad. In fact it looks cool.

  • Marpets1
    1 points Oct 22,2019, 9:38pm

    If you want it all gone, chemical paint stripper is your only choice. Better to have done it first before sanding, though.

  • Desdraftlit
    1 points Oct 23,2019, 8:47am

    Visit /powerwashingporn

  • Ive_Got_Cheese
    1 points Oct 23,2019, 5:55pm

    Could you give it a coat of wood stain?

  • rgliberty
    1 points Oct 23,2019, 7:15pm

    Why does your Halloween costume require a completely stripped bat?

  • GrubbyScrub
    0 points Oct 22,2019, 9:34pm

    lightly but yes keep at it

● ● ●

Tore this out down to the frame (the wood was old). Any recommendations for replacing it, or good source for the pediment and trim?

DIY

COMMENTS

  • Howcanaangelbrkmyhrt
    1 points Oct 21,2019, 1:39pm

    I can't be sure, but you should be able to find the top part of the crown at a local big box store; it looks pretty standard. Should be relatively simple to replicate the bottom part with a jigsaw. Glue the two together and nail it back up. I can't tell if you cut the circular part out of the pediment or if that's part of the design. If it's not you could square it off and insert a replacement sheet or honestly leave it as part of the design (looks ok to me).

  • bostoneddie
    1 points Oct 21,2019, 1:44pm

    Take the pieces to your local lumber yard that sells mill work and you should be to find reasonable replacements. Big-box hardware stores like the Depot may have some parts but the selection will be better at a real lumber place. The fluted trim on the sides for example is widely available. You probably won’t get an exact match but it should be a good replacement. You may have to cut the flat triangular part of the pediment out of wood yourself. In terms of the work, you’ll need a miter saw and a finish nailer to cut the trim to size and nail it back up. After that, fill the nail holes, caulk, prime, and paint.

  • prescottdonut
    1 points Oct 21,2019, 2:16pm

    My local lumber yard in bfe Iowa can source this kind of trim in pvc. Your other option is to try to find a local guy who has a cnc and they should be able to replicate pretty easily.

COMMENTS

  • Howcanaangelbrkmyhrt
    1 points Oct 21,2019, 1:39pm

    I can't be sure, but you should be able to find the top part of the crown at a local big box store; it looks pretty standard. Should be relatively simple to replicate the bottom part with a jigsaw. Glue the two together and nail it back up. I can't tell if you cut the circular part out of the pediment or if that's part of the design. If it's not you could square it off and insert a replacement sheet or honestly leave it as part of the design (looks ok to me).

  • bostoneddie
    1 points Oct 21,2019, 1:44pm

    Take the pieces to your local lumber yard that sells mill work and you should be to find reasonable replacements. Big-box hardware stores like the Depot may have some parts but the selection will be better at a real lumber place. The fluted trim on the sides for example is widely available. You probably won’t get an exact match but it should be a good replacement. You may have to cut the flat triangular part of the pediment out of wood yourself. In terms of the work, you’ll need a miter saw and a finish nailer to cut the trim to size and nail it back up. After that, fill the nail holes, caulk, prime, and paint.

  • prescottdonut
    1 points Oct 21,2019, 2:16pm

    My local lumber yard in bfe Iowa can source this kind of trim in pvc. Your other option is to try to find a local guy who has a cnc and they should be able to replicate pretty easily.

● ● ●

Trying to replace a utility sink in the laundry room. PVC won’t budge, is this glued?

DIY

COMMENTS

  • TheUnRealTylerDurden
    20 points Oct 20,2019, 7:21pm

    That purple stuff is pvc pipe glue

  • justsoicanfilter
    3 points Oct 20,2019, 7:33pm

    Thanks for the quick responses! I’m a new homeowner so I think I’m already in over my head. Will most likely just call a plumber

  • TheSignGuy
    6 points Oct 20,2019, 7:25pm

    Unfortunately... Yes. Some... Jerk... Glued that together for absolutely no reason other than to cause someone like you to have an aneurysm when there's an issue... Cut that off, and replace with actual threaded joints like it's supposed to be.

  • Clintinator
    2 points Oct 20,2019, 7:23pm

    Yes glued won’t be able to take it apart. Will have to cut it off down stream of the trap then it will thread off the bottom of the sink.

  • TalesFromThe
    3 points Oct 20,2019, 7:22pm

    Purple= PVC glue. You’ll have to use a hack saw and get some new fittings. Don’t forget the purple glue. And don’t use that flexy-bendy pipe. Use actual solid PVC.

  • madcat939
    1 points Oct 20,2019, 7:36pm

    PVC pipe glue is like concrete cut it with a reciprocating saw

  • ozphobia
    1 points Oct 20,2019, 8:18pm

    So it looks like the coupling to the sink is threaded, so you could cut horozontally at the purple line below the drain, then vertically an the line. Then replace with a proper cleanable trap.

    Australian here so not sure if you can purchase the slip over o ring style traps.

  • DownloadedPixelz
    1 points Oct 20,2019, 8:24pm

    Very

  • lostinvegas
    1 points Oct 20,2019, 8:00pm

    Why in the hell would someone do this?

COMMENTS

  • TheUnRealTylerDurden
    20 points Oct 20,2019, 7:21pm

    That purple stuff is pvc pipe glue

  • justsoicanfilter
    3 points Oct 20,2019, 7:33pm

    Thanks for the quick responses! I’m a new homeowner so I think I’m already in over my head. Will most likely just call a plumber

  • TheSignGuy
    6 points Oct 20,2019, 7:25pm

    Unfortunately... Yes. Some... Jerk... Glued that together for absolutely no reason other than to cause someone like you to have an aneurysm when there's an issue... Cut that off, and replace with actual threaded joints like it's supposed to be.

  • LicitArk
    2 points Oct 20,2019, 7:21pm

    Yes

  • Clintinator
    2 points Oct 20,2019, 7:23pm

    Yes glued won’t be able to take it apart. Will have to cut it off down stream of the trap then it will thread off the bottom of the sink.

  • TalesFromThe
    3 points Oct 20,2019, 7:22pm

    Purple= PVC glue. You’ll have to use a hack saw and get some new fittings. Don’t forget the purple glue. And don’t use that flexy-bendy pipe. Use actual solid PVC.

  • madcat939
    1 points Oct 20,2019, 7:36pm

    PVC pipe glue is like concrete cut it with a reciprocating saw

  • ozphobia
    1 points Oct 20,2019, 8:18pm

    So it looks like the coupling to the sink is threaded, so you could cut horozontally at the purple line below the drain, then vertically an the line. Then replace with a proper cleanable trap.

    Australian here so not sure if you can purchase the slip over o ring style traps.

  • DownloadedPixelz
    1 points Oct 20,2019, 8:24pm

    Very

  • lostinvegas
    1 points Oct 20,2019, 8:00pm

    Why in the hell would someone do this?

● ● ●

Whoops...

DIY

COMMENTS

  • jw071
    1 points Oct 20,2019, 8:37pm

    Yeah the handle is supposed to face inwards

COMMENTS

  • jw071
    1 points Oct 20,2019, 8:37pm

    Yeah the handle is supposed to face inwards

● ● ●

How can I fix this?

DIY

COMMENTS

  • coloradical710
    5 points Oct 18,2019, 7:52am

    Spackle, texture, prime, and paint

  • blacklassie
    2 points Oct 18,2019, 8:12am

    It looks like someone applied a spackle coat over a painted wall with a layer of paper (wallpaper?) in between? You’ll need to trim away any of that top coating that’s loose. Place mesh tape in the low spots and respackle. You’ll probably need more than one coat of spackle, as it typically cracks or shrinks when it dries. Sand flat and paint.

  • kittenrice
    1 points Oct 18,2019, 11:15am

    Remove whatever is loose including any brown paper that has separated.

    Prime the brown paper with an oil based primer or PRO-999 RX-35, do not skip this step, the brown paper will separate due to the moisture in the patching mud and it will bubble, will means you'll have start over, this time with the priming step.

    Patch and proceed with texture, paint, etc.

COMMENTS

  • coloradical710
    5 points Oct 18,2019, 7:52am

    Spackle, texture, prime, and paint

  • blacklassie
    2 points Oct 18,2019, 8:12am

    It looks like someone applied a spackle coat over a painted wall with a layer of paper (wallpaper?) in between? You’ll need to trim away any of that top coating that’s loose. Place mesh tape in the low spots and respackle. You’ll probably need more than one coat of spackle, as it typically cracks or shrinks when it dries. Sand flat and paint.

  • kittenrice
    1 points Oct 18,2019, 11:15am

    Remove whatever is loose including any brown paper that has separated.

    Prime the brown paper with an oil based primer or PRO-999 RX-35, do not skip this step, the brown paper will separate due to the moisture in the patching mud and it will bubble, will means you'll have start over, this time with the priming step.

    Patch and proceed with texture, paint, etc.

● ● ●

I had a damp course put in 4 years ago. Our sofa is up against the exterior wall where course was put in. I pulled sofa away to reveal this. Is it lack of air flow problem or a damp course problem?

DIY

COMMENTS

  • GerrardsClaw
    6 points Oct 17,2019, 2:49pm

    It is not uncommon to find this behind furniture which is situated against an external wall. It is down to the wall being colder, and the air being trapped by the Sofa. It will clean off, and if you either move the sofa or leave a much bigger air gap then it won't come back again.

  • YouShouldntSmoke
    1 points Oct 17,2019, 1:48pm

    Another photo here

    https://imgur.com/a/2nUVgeW

    The mold is limited to side height

COMMENTS

  • GerrardsClaw
    6 points Oct 17,2019, 2:49pm

    It is not uncommon to find this behind furniture which is situated against an external wall. It is down to the wall being colder, and the air being trapped by the Sofa. It will clean off, and if you either move the sofa or leave a much bigger air gap then it won't come back again.

  • YouShouldntSmoke
    1 points Oct 17,2019, 1:48pm

    Another photo here

    https://imgur.com/a/2nUVgeW

    The mold is limited to side height

● ● ●

DIY Halloween

DIY

● ● ●

How to convert this grassy to more parking space? Pavers? Concrete? Gravel? Ski town. Colder climate. 40×8ft

DIY

COMMENTS

  • dielectricunion
    41 points Oct 14,2019, 1:18am

    Better check city code on impervious cover limits or you could find yourself ripping it out again thus paying twice for no gain of spaces.

  • Skonono
    17 points Oct 14,2019, 1:08am

    I’d recommend some turfstone. You’ll have functional parking without a sea of pavement.

  • SpinToWin360
    9 points Oct 14,2019, 1:51am
  • Theageofpisces
    3 points Oct 14,2019, 10:44am

    You might consider getting a survey first, since you’ll be working close to the property lines.

  • thepageofswords
    2 points Oct 14,2019, 6:40am

    Pavers or some other permeable surface.

  • new_attendant
    1 points Oct 14,2019, 11:21am

    Thank you all for the comments. We have narrowed down our choice to turfstone vs concrete. We have our winter about to start so project is probably for sometime next spring or so. Cheers!

  • remorackman
    0 points Oct 14,2019, 1:12am

    Is it all yours to convert? If so, i second the concrete suggestion. You have the "forms" already there... it is ready to strip, prep and pour!

  • RIPPINTARE
    -1 points Oct 14,2019, 1:04am

    Concrete all the way. Strip, prep, form, pour.

COMMENTS

  • dielectricunion
    41 points Oct 14,2019, 1:18am

    Better check city code on impervious cover limits or you could find yourself ripping it out again thus paying twice for no gain of spaces.

  • Skonono
    17 points Oct 14,2019, 1:08am

    I’d recommend some turfstone. You’ll have functional parking without a sea of pavement.

  • SpinToWin360
    9 points Oct 14,2019, 1:51am
  • SheepGoesBaaaa
    3 points Oct 14,2019, 4:50am

    Gravel would give you better drainage?

  • Theageofpisces
    3 points Oct 14,2019, 10:44am

    You might consider getting a survey first, since you’ll be working close to the property lines.

  • thepageofswords
    2 points Oct 14,2019, 6:40am

    Pavers or some other permeable surface.

  • new_attendant
    1 points Oct 14,2019, 11:21am

    Thank you all for the comments. We have narrowed down our choice to turfstone vs concrete. We have our winter about to start so project is probably for sometime next spring or so. Cheers!

  • remorackman
    0 points Oct 14,2019, 1:12am

    Is it all yours to convert? If so, i second the concrete suggestion. You have the "forms" already there... it is ready to strip, prep and pour!

  • RIPPINTARE
    -1 points Oct 14,2019, 1:04am

    Concrete all the way. Strip, prep, form, pour.

● ● ●

Crane brand shower stem repair issue

DIY

● ● ●

Will I need to level floorboards before ply?

DIY

COMMENTS

  • VladimirOrwell
    2 points Oct 13,2019, 8:05am

    What do the floor joist under the floor look like?

  • mkhalaji
    2 points Oct 13,2019, 8:09am

    That looks like an abrupt dip in the floor. I would repair the floor joist under the floor boards first. Just about any flooring you put on that will have problems in the near future except carpet.

  • 9998000
    2 points Oct 13,2019, 8:37am

    Knock off high spots. Get it to about 6mm max deviation.

  • Total_HD
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 8:06am

    What are you putting on the ply?

    Generally speaking, no.

  • A-Grey-World
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 8:06am

    I'm planning on laying solid parquet flooring. As the floorboard quality is not good I'm putting down 12mm ply.

    I didn't realise how "bulgy" the floor is however until I see how much the boards rock.

    The plywood can't level this kind of larger irregularities. Would this causes problems with the solid wood glued on top?

  • Iamshoprat
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 8:34am

    You'll want that hump to be flat , or you would have to raise the rest of the floor to be level with the highest point of the hump , so pull the floor boards and level those joist , and don't forget to trash talk the guy who did the last repair on that floor.

  • mkhalaji
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 8:53am

    I am not a pro but very handy. Have done a lot of work that surprised my self. This one I would pass along to a contractor. A bulge up repair is definitely not as easy as shimming a dip.

  • Eastern_Canuck
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 8:55am

    Pull/beat in what nails you might hit and plane off the the high spotsTHEN if your worried I would lay a layer of 3/8-1/2 plywood down to take up the inconsistencies

  • VladimirOrwell
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 3:14pm

    What does the joist look like. Was is wood destroying organisms, or just a cracked joist?

  • VladimirOrwell
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 3:15pm

    Look like the bad joist caused the floor to sink. But that’s just my opinion. I’d need to see more to say for sure.

  • VladimirOrwell
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 6:23pm

    That’s odd. I’ll have to run that by the people I work for. See if they have any ideas.

  • VladimirOrwell
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 6:26pm

    I’d say the same thing after looking at the pics you took. With the way your doing the work, I’d assume it’s on a crawlspace? I’d definitely recommend a qualified contractor to evaluate and repair if needed.

COMMENTS

  • VladimirOrwell
    2 points Oct 13,2019, 8:05am

    What do the floor joist under the floor look like?

  • mkhalaji
    2 points Oct 13,2019, 8:09am

    That looks like an abrupt dip in the floor. I would repair the floor joist under the floor boards first. Just about any flooring you put on that will have problems in the near future except carpet.

  • 9998000
    2 points Oct 13,2019, 8:37am

    Knock off high spots. Get it to about 6mm max deviation.

  • hipdogjacksix
    2 points Oct 13,2019, 8:59am

    You can get a cement type floor leveller. It will fill the dip in the floor. If your going to repair the floor joist your putting your self into a huge job that your probably going to find more problems.Are those actually 2x4 floors joists???

  • Total_HD
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 8:06am

    What are you putting on the ply?

    Generally speaking, no.

  • A-Grey-World
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 8:06am

    I'm planning on laying solid parquet flooring. As the floorboard quality is not good I'm putting down 12mm ply.

    I didn't realise how "bulgy" the floor is however until I see how much the boards rock.

    The plywood can't level this kind of larger irregularities. Would this causes problems with the solid wood glued on top?

  • Iamshoprat
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 8:34am

    You'll want that hump to be flat , or you would have to raise the rest of the floor to be level with the highest point of the hump , so pull the floor boards and level those joist , and don't forget to trash talk the guy who did the last repair on that floor.

  • mkhalaji
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 8:53am

    I am not a pro but very handy. Have done a lot of work that surprised my self. This one I would pass along to a contractor. A bulge up repair is definitely not as easy as shimming a dip.

  • Eastern_Canuck
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 8:55am

    Pull/beat in what nails you might hit and plane off the the high spotsTHEN if your worried I would lay a layer of 3/8-1/2 plywood down to take up the inconsistencies

  • VladimirOrwell
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 3:14pm

    What does the joist look like. Was is wood destroying organisms, or just a cracked joist?

  • VladimirOrwell
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 3:15pm

    Look like the bad joist caused the floor to sink. But that’s just my opinion. I’d need to see more to say for sure.

  • VladimirOrwell
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 6:23pm

    That’s odd. I’ll have to run that by the people I work for. See if they have any ideas.

  • VladimirOrwell
    1 points Oct 13,2019, 6:26pm

    I’d say the same thing after looking at the pics you took. With the way your doing the work, I’d assume it’s on a crawlspace? I’d definitely recommend a qualified contractor to evaluate and repair if needed.